Wondering

Posted by: Leslie

Wondering - 03/28/13 07:42 PM

where I might be able to find some kitchen units.
Any ideas?
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Wondering - 03/28/13 08:13 PM

Uh huh huh huh

You said unit.
Posted by: Leslie

Re: Wondering - 03/28/13 08:32 PM

I could have said "junk". grin
Posted by: KateSorensen

Re: Wondering - 03/28/13 08:47 PM

.

Wondering, wondering, who's kissin' you?

I have an 8 track of Web Pierce songs that I played over and over in the '60s.




It has nothing to do with the price of rice in China or this thread but since someone planted it in my mind, I had to go look it up and play it. wink



.
Posted by: Leslie

Re: Wondering - 03/28/13 09:06 PM

Listened to the whole song and qute enjoyed it.

BTW The price of rice in China is surprisingly high. The Chinese pay about 3.6 yuan for one kilogram of rice. In American money this comes out to about .44 cents per kilogram. There are about 35 ounces in one kilogram!
Posted by: KateSorensen

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 10:37 AM

.

Good grief, Leslie. Now you got me to wondering where/how that expression came into being?

Quote:
"What's that got to do with the -- ?" is an expression which is used to denote something which is unrelated to the current topic of discussion.

A common form "what does that have to do with the price of tea {rice} in China?", is a retort to an irrelevant suggestion. This facetious usage implies that the topic under discussion might as well be the price of tea in China for all the relevance the interlocutor's suggestion bears on it. It has been said[by whom?] that this expression has stemmed from economists, who describe everything economic as affecting everything else, trying to find an expression which denotes the farthest logical connection from their current economic focus, in a sort of butterfly effect. In this way, the price of tea in China was used to denote the farthest possibility. It can also be used to denote an irrelevant topic.

In the United States, the phrase "What's that got to do with the price of eggs?" has been in use since the 1920s. The variance "of tea in China" seems to date from the 1940s and may be influenced by the idiom All the Tea in China. The British equivalent is "What's that got to do with the price of fish?" or "What's that got to do with the price of meat?". A Scottish variation is "What's that got to do with the price of cheese?", and a Northern Irish variation is "What's that got to do with the price of a sausage?".

There is also the derivative form of "what does that have to do with the price of rice in China," due to the common association between countries of Asia and rice. This variant was famously used in the 1976 film, Network.


wink

and thanks.

.
Posted by: Leslie

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 12:22 PM

It's always interesting and (usually) fun, how one thing leads to another with this gang.
We all walk away a little wiser. But, whats that got to with the colours of the rainbow?
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Leslie
There are about 35 ounces in one kilogram!
We're still not on the metric system in the US, it's been around 40 years of trying but we still haven't embraced it yet.

The things most of do know though for some reason is that there 28 grams to an ounce, and 2.2 lbs/35 ounces, in a kilo. grin
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 01:20 PM

Yeah--somehow or other, one does know those equivalences. Even if one is not flying into Los Angeleees.
Posted by: Leslie

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 01:28 PM

I'm sure it is just a matter of time. There are very few countries that have not converted. The old saying in commerce is "Speak in English and measure in metric".
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 02:57 PM

Originally Posted By: Jim_
Originally Posted By: Leslie
There are about 35 ounces in one kilogram!
We're still not on the metric system in the US, it's been around 40 years of trying but we still haven't embraced it yet.

The things most of do know though for some reason is that there 28 grams to an ounce, and 2.2 lbs/35 ounces, in a kilo. grin


Down here in Miami we just pronounce it "Key".
I'm getting a Key of...uh... super sticky Amsterdam...uh..uh...rice. Yeah! Rice!


Hehe... jk.. it's key EVERYWHERE!
Posted by: carp

Re: Wondering - 03/29/13 04:39 PM

44 cents is cheap.

We pay little over a buck for a pound of rice