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Posted by: nathan2480

[edit] - 06/13/04 07:52 PM

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Posted by: krusher117

Re:Building a mac - 06/13/04 10:00 PM

I second that! I would love to see someone start with the mobo and build a mac from scratch. I know that Macresq and others sell logic boards a la carte.
Posted by: whitlock

Re:Building a mac - 06/14/04 11:19 AM

you've never done that before? well then, if it wasn't for the fact i wanted to keep my current case, i'd be more than glad to do it. well, if someone would give me a free beige g3...
Posted by: parallax7d

Re:Building a mac - 08/07/04 03:24 AM

I too would be interested in building my own mac. Has anyone here done it?
Posted by: whitlock

Re:Building a mac - 08/07/04 04:48 AM

I have done it. When you have a lot of mac parts, and no one coming into a repair store (supprise supprise - guess they don't break), you can get bored real fast. I saw my desktop at work get sold one day and needed to put something together fast. Dropped a beige G3 mobo into an ATX case, literally hot glued and duct taped the power supply in, and sawed off the I/O cover on the back so I could plug things into it. To be honest, looked like hell. But it worked. The board was sold the next week.


Well, my first tip is to find a logic board from a DECENT vendor. Make sure you can return the board if it comes bad. I've seen it happen too many times. You would be supprised how many bad logic boards Apple sends out to the repair stores. Also, get the coresponding power supply. You will waste so much time and effort trying to mod a power supply to do what you want, it is easier just to buy the one that was made for the board. Heat sinks - don't worry about that, unless you are going to overclock. The chasis itself is going to be entirely up to you. There are great tutorials on how to get a mobo into a ATX form factor case. Make your own case if you have to. But buy the coresponding P/S for the logic board you choose. That is my best advice.

If MacResQ has a board available for what you need, Kyle in the resale dept. is pretty cool. He is a tome when it comes to stuff like this.


I edited it because I felt like I should add some more content to this post, as opposed to another post. Spamming - meh. Not neccessary.

Post edited by: whitlock, at: 2004/08/07 04:55
Posted by: oojacoboo

Re:Building a mac - 08/07/04 09:18 AM

If it is a G4 that you are looking for I deserve like 100 karma points for this link. Unfortunately I don't think that it is going to be possible for us to get a hold of this guide on our site. Therefore, I may have to post a link to it in the mod guides. Just hate to do that you know, who is to say that it will work tomorrow :dry: .

http://www.macopz.com/buildamac/

Enjoy!
Posted by: TutAnGeek

Re:Building a mac - 08/07/04 01:12 PM

whitlock wrote:
Quote:
I have done it. When you have a lot of mac parts, and no one coming into a repair store (supprise supprise - guess they don't break), you can get bored real fast. I saw my desktop at work get sold one day and needed to put something together fast. Dropped a beige G3 mobo into an ATX case, literally hot glued and duct taped the power supply in, and sawed off the I/O cover on the back so I could plug things into it. To be honest, looked like hell. But it worked. The board was sold the next week.

You do realize that the g3 beige (both tower and desktop) were ATX compatible? In fact, some towers shipped with ATX PSU's. There's a jumper somewhere on the board to switch back and forth. I think it's labeled "PSU: MAC | PC" or something like that. I'm not in front of mine now.

Quote:
I edited it because I felt like I should add some more content to this post, as opposed to another post. Spamming - meh. Not neccessary.<br><br>Post edited by: whitlock, at: 2004/08/07 04:55

Thanks wink
Posted by: whitlock

Re:Building a mac - 08/07/04 05:43 PM

IO covers did not match up, so it was easier to remove it. This was not a show computer, for Pete's sake.

I've never seen this switch that allows you to go from Mac to PC on the board. You mean the PS/2 jumper? Oh yeah, those are only on the G3 Gossamer series, which was the Beige G3 units like the AOI's, Towers, and Desktops. The Towers already were using the PS/2 switch. That is usually indicative of where a board came out of. Obviously model number and jumper block are dead give aways. Anything newer and older just does not have a jumper like that. The reason why is that the Gossamers were meant for basically clone machines at first.

I was aware that you can put a different power supply into the beige, but we actually did not have any spares. That was sad. Our stock the whole time I was there was 2 ATX and 2 AT power supplies. We had dozens of Mac power supplies for every model. Not exagerating that one, but only 2 of each for PC's. I Think one day we had 4 ATX in stock, but we promptly used them.

As for the board automounting into the case, it was easy. It's an ATX board, simply put. The board fit like a dream. I had to remove some of the risers for the board, but it that's all it took.

The case itself was junk. It had been dropped, the support between the front and the back had been broken off, we had used part of the mounting for a customers PC. There was a lot of work to be done. There was a piece of wood wedged between the botton of the P/S and another support in the case, which was hot glued into it. Took some duct tape and wrapped it in the back of the P/S to make sure it was even. Not ON the back, below to prop it up. Screwed the wood into the frame. Ugliest POS I've ever worked with. That's why I had to use Glue and Tape. We didn't even have a decent spare ATX.

Well, that's the story, continued.