Dog chow

Posted by: MrB

Dog chow - 03/07/14 01:50 PM

Watching a Purina Dog Chow commercial showing brown, red, green, yellow , pieces of crud. Advertised to have fewer calories. I'm thing , WHAT. Dogs have limited color recognition why all those colors.

Well, only one reason. Too look good to the humans that buy the stuff.

https://dogchow.com/dog-food/1267/light-and-healthy

Here are the ingredients of this " healthy" stuff


Purina® Dog Chow ® Light & Healthy Brand Adult Dog Food

Ingredients:
Whole grain corn, soybean hulls, meat and bone meal, whole grain wheat, soybean meal, soybean germ meal, corn germ meal, egg and chicken flavor, corn gluten meal, chicken, animal digest, soy flour, turkey by-product meal, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), glycerin, salt, calcium carbonate, Vitamin E supplement, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Red 40, zinc sulfate, sulfur, choline chloride, ferrous sulfate, Yellow 5, Blue 2, manganese sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, copper sulfate, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, Vitamin B-12 supplement, garlic oil, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, folic acid, menadone sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), biotin, sodium selenite. A-4122


The only food I see is "chicken" hidden down in the pack. And those colors thrown in. Yuck!
The second ingredient is "soy bean hulls " . On the farm I can't ever remember our dogs eating soy bean hulls as a choice.

Dave
Posted by: Nana

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 12:30 AM

When I mentioned to the vet that I sometimes give my cat raw tuna as a "treat," I thought she was going to go into a convulsion! Told me 101 reasons why not to give a cat tuna.

That was 5 yrs & about 101 raw tuna treats ago. whistle
Posted by: MrB

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 03:16 AM

I realize, pets need nutrition and their food can ce "enhanced" like humans do to theirs but was watching a dog food commercial and for a mioment thought I was watching a human nutrition show as it showed a dog food with " vegetables that your dog loves, blueberries, wheat grain, spinach, and real chicken or fish" . Thought , that I couldn't remember when I fed my dog spinach on the farm.

It's not that pets don't need some of those things but what the marketers were doing was catering to the fad tastes of their owners. I understand that dog food testers eat the food to determine if dogs will like it . Strange.

Also I understand that in the wild, predators must eat meals quickly so must eat the most powerful food first as they may be chased away from their kill. Not so much now and also they have been bred to live as humans now. Sad really.

That is why I've refused to have a dog while I live in a city. Can't stand to see animals cooped up, but I digress from my own thread

Dave
Posted by: Nana

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 03:50 AM

Quote:
I understand that dog food testers eat the food to determine if dogs will like it . Strange.

Very strange indeed since dogs will eat their own stink-stink. laugh
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 07:27 AM

Originally Posted By: MrB
I realize, pets need nutrition and their food can ce "enhanced" like humans do to theirs but was watching a dog food commercial and for a mioment thought I was watching a human nutrition show as it showed a dog food with " vegetables that your dog loves, blueberries, wheat grain, spinach, and real chicken or fish" . Thought , that I couldn't remember when I fed my dog spinach on the farm.
Dogs are omnivores, cats are carnivores, that's why dog food is not good for cats, not enough protein. Dogs need the fruits and veggies along with the protein.
Posted by: garyW

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 09:09 AM

This is my Sadie, rolling her eyes at you, knowing her multi-color chow is just plain delicious ... wondering what the heck a "farm" is. laugh




Posted by: yoyo52

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 09:36 AM

Our little guy, Max, was very fond of broccoli. Go figure.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 11:06 AM


Hector loved Donuts
Fritz loved mushrooms
Red loved Bell Peppers,
Eartha Kitt loved Raisins
and a buddy's cat would kill
you for any variety of OLIVE!
LOL No Accounting For Taste(s)!
Posted by: Nana

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 12:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Celandine

Hector loved Donuts
Fritz loved mushrooms
Red loved Bell Peppers,
Eartha Kitt loved Raisins
and a buddy's cat would kill
you for any variety of OLIVE!
LOL No Accounting For Taste(s)!

laugh LOVE IT! Deserves 2 snaps up with a booty twerk.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 02:31 PM


R U Kidding? CATWOMAN?

& SHE had the cATTITUDE to Go-With!
Posted by: MrB

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 02:33 PM

Double check. You are correct. Even tho they are descended from wolves, dogs need much less protein and can thrive on grain. I just never thought to give our dogs soy bean hulls.

Dave
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 06:22 PM

Raisins can be toxic to both cats and dogs.

http://www.vetstreet.com/care/human-foods-that-are-dangerous-for-dogs-and-cats

Had a cat years back that loved Wendy's chili, it has onions, didn't think about it. He died of renal failure around 9-10.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Dog chow - 03/08/14 07:05 PM


WHOA! who'da' thunk it!

She never had enough in one sitting to have bothered her
She used to enjoy having breakfast with me... she'd
had a sweet tooth since we got her... her favorite
thing was what I called "Hot-Buttered Crummies"
... the edges of the bakery pastries such as Scones,
that I'd split & warm in a frying pan with butter...
She'd nibble the crumbs left on the plate...

I used to peel off most of the sugar frosting, and
she'd suck that down as well... One day I gave her
a raisin... just for laughs.. and was shocked when
she gobbled it up and looked for more! ..so it
became our morning routine a couple mornings a week.

A few times she even drank coffee out of my cup,
even when I attempted to block her, she forced her
head between my fingers and sucked it up as well.

Go figure! shocked

What finally did her in was sleeping on a heating pad. frown

We lost her at the tender age of 13 to rampant cancer.
Posted by: MrB

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 01:31 AM

I've heard so much about chocolate beaning a Bain to dogs, so looked it up. Seems it can give dogs problems if they eat too much. My brother had a Jack Russell sized dog. From one site found it would have to eat four pounds in one setting to hurt it.

So a bit of Hershey's once in a while shouldn't give it much harm.

Dave
Posted by: musicalmarv7

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 03:46 AM

Buy Iams products you will not see these artificial ingredients in there or Science Diet.Your dog deserves the best.
Posted by: steveg

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 04:09 AM

Yep, my X's late poodle, Maizee used to love boiled chicken breast or ground beef with mixed veggies for breakfast. And cut up apple slices were a fav treat.
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 06:05 AM

Originally Posted By: MrB
I've heard so much about chocolate beaning a Bain to dogs, so looked it up. Seems it can give dogs problems if they eat too much. My brother had a Jack Russell sized dog. From one site found it would have to eat four pounds in one setting to hurt it.

So a bit of Hershey's once in a while shouldn't give it much harm.

Dave


I can't remember what the toxin is... but there is a toxin in chocolate that humans process and get rid of in their waste. Dogs can not process the toxin or excrete it, so it has a cumulative effect.

===

Ahhh.. theobromine.

http://www.bing.com/search?q=dogs+chocol...2b950ca667a67e5
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 06:09 AM

Here's a chart with a poundage per dog size.

http://www.phouka.com/dogs/dog_choc.html
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 06:15 AM

Toxicity for cats is even worse.

Correction.. they do process the theobromine... but very slowly.


Quote:
Serious poisoning happens more frequently in domestic animals, which metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans, and can easily consume enough chocolate to cause chocolate poisoning. If large numbers of filled chocolate candies are consumed, another serious danger is posed by the fat and sugar in the fillings, which can sometimes trigger life-threatening pancreatitis several days later. The most common victims of theobromine poisoning are dogs,[3][4][5] for which it can be fatal. The toxic dose for cats is even lower than for dogs. However, cats are less prone to eating chocolate since they are unable to taste sweetness.
In dogs, the half-life of theobromine is 17.5 hours; in severe cases, clinical symptoms of theobromine poisoning can persist for 72 hours.[7] Medical treatment performed by a veterinarian involves inducing vomiting within two hours of ingestion and administration of benzodiazepines or barbiturates for seizures, antiarrhythmics for heart arrhythmias, and fluid diuresis. Theobromine is also suspected to induce right atrial cardiomyopathy after long term exposure at levels equivalent to ~15 g of dark chocolate per kg of weight and per day.[8] A typical 20 kg (44 lb) dog will normally experience intestinal distress after eating less than 240 g (8.5 oz) of dark chocolate, but won't necessarily experience bradycardia or tachyarrhythmia unless it eats at least 0.5 kg (1.1 lb) of milk chocolate. According to the Merck Veterinary Manual, baker's chocolate of approximately 1.3 g/kg (0.02 oz/lb) of a dog's body weight is sufficient to cause symptoms of toxicity. For example, 2.25-ounce (64 g) of baker's chocolate would be enough to produce symptoms in a 20-pound (9.1 kg) dog, while a 60% cacao chocolate bar be 60% as toxic as the same dose of baker's chocolate; however, other types of chocolate (such as milk chocolate candies) contain significantly less theombromine and so require the dog to ingest more before showing symptoms.[9]

Chemists with the USDA are investigating the use of theobromine as a toxicant to control coyotes that prey on livestock.[10


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobromine_poisoning
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 06:39 AM

Originally Posted By: MrB
I've heard so much about chocolate beaning a Bain to dogs, so looked it up. Seems it can give dogs problems if they eat too much. My brother had a Jack Russell sized dog. From one site found it would have to eat four pounds in one setting to hurt it.

So a bit of Hershey's once in a while shouldn't give it much harm.
Yep, you're the expert. smirk
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 07:09 AM


My ol' man & his dog, Dusty used to sit on the porch
eating chocolate ice cream and Hershey bars...
...that's prolly what caused Dusty's death... frown
...he was prolly high on chocolate when the car hit him.
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 09:20 AM

Originally Posted By: Celandine

My ol' man & his dog, Dusty used to sit on the porch
eating chocolate ice cream and Hershey bars...
...that's prolly what caused Dusty's death... frown
…he was probably high on chocolate when the car hit him.
LOL. According to Nuc's links there's not much chocolate in ice cream, and a large dog would have to eat a couple of pounds or so of milk chocolate. It's the dark and semi-sweet that are really bad.

How did the heating pad kill Eartha BTW, or did I miss the earth humor? smirk
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 10:18 AM

in the same way that "THEY" claim
that prolonged direct contact with
Cell Phones causes BRAIN TUMORS.

Miss Kitty* was tiny & petite, with
low body mass & very short fur,
like that of an Abyssinian Cat.
She could always be found either
straddling a Hot-Air Duct, or
curled up on an Electric Heating pad.

*she was known by Many Names, one
of which was "Chilly Milly"


"SHE" was the only cat we'd ever had
to do so, and coincidently, the only
cat to die so young... and of cancer
throughout her entire body. frown


uh..
the Eartha Kitt connection was more
than merely physical although she was
strikingly graceful, lithe, compact &
tightly muscular (weighing in at 7 lbs
when fully grown)she was also highly
intelligent(...TOO INTELLIGENT!) bold,
assertive, ...and very communicative...
not only vocally, but had ways of making
herself understood in very striking ways.
Posted by: MrB

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 02:45 PM

Not at all, I'm just a sceptic .

There's this show on afternoons on TV, a good looking doctor with a show catering to women. He might have a lot to say, and might be very accomplished as a medical doctor, but his show sounds and acts like an informercial so anything he says makes me skeptical .

Dave
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 05:30 PM

Originally Posted By: MrB
Not at all, I'm just a sceptic .

There's this show on afternoons on TV, a good looking doctor with a show catering to women. He might have a lot to say, and might be very accomplished as a medical doctor, but his show sounds and acts like an informercial so anything he says makes me skeptical .
I'm a skeptic too, bit not sure where the info on dogs and chocolates fits into your explanation. What do all of the sources that say it can be bad for an animal have to gain as compared to a show covertly advertising products for women?

Do what you want to yourself. Being skeptical and taking a chance on the health of something that can't tell you how it's feeling, just because you think you're right, is a bit selfish, IMO. Sort of bordering on narcissism, though not in the sense of physical appearance.
Posted by: MrB

Re: Dog chow - 03/09/14 08:16 PM

No info I found said chocolate was good for your animal. Some say that less is needed to harm than others. That's what I'm saying. I say animals should eat what is natural for them not what a human says is good for them. I am sceptic when someone, claiming, to be an expert, says that something will cure me of something.

When a man on TV, for example, brings out these products telling us they will fix us and his show resembles the nutribulet, or any other, informercial, a red flag is raised in my mind. The comments are said to accept that the information he shares might be beneficial, but that I need to look further into it.

As for the nutribulet, I think it might be a decent small blender.

Also, obviously giving your animal, chocolate , especially an significant amount, is dangerous for him. Actually, I believe giving your pet any unnatural sweet is not a good idea.

As for my being narcistic. Hardly

Dave