For the Plant Experts?

Posted by: Mike

For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 02:15 PM

What kind of a plant is this? Poisonous berries?

Weird One!
Posted by: Celandine

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 03:03 PM


I can't play your video.

What kind of plant is it?
Bush? Vine? Plant?

Evergreen? confused
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 03:54 PM

Weird.. it played once and was so short I needed to see it again... but it wouldn't play after that first time.
Posted by: Papa

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 03:59 PM

It looks like pokeberry.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytolacca
Posted by: Pirate

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 04:59 PM

That is a poke plant...while the berries are green in the photo they will eventually turn dark red/purple..do not eat the berries...they will at the very least make you sick. http://www.aces.edu/dept/extcomm/newspaper/june21b02.html

Old country folk eat the poke plant when it is young and tender, however conventional wisdom is not to eat any of the plant because all parts of it are not good for man or beast.

I had a huge stand of poke plants in my yard that no matter what I did to them they kept coming back
Posted by: Celandine

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 07:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Pirate


I had a huge stand of poke plants in my yard that no matter what I did to them they kept coming back


LOL That's understandable...

Have you ever seen a Poke Root? crazy

It gets bigger every year, and every time it's
allowed to put out foliage, it photosynthesizes
more food/energy that's stored in the perennial
root that gives the plant the energy needed to
increase in size and vigor year by year.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/03/13 07:41 PM


Even though the berries are poisonous to people
birds are immune to their toxin, and like them
very much, the same as they love to little white
berries of Poison Ivy. So much so, that they make
it a point to plant both every where they s_it.

When we entertained a member of the local Audubon
Society, during the post-lecture Q&A someone asked;
'what can we plant to attract more birds to our
yard?' the lecturer just smiled and said; "You
don't need to plant anything. If you have a clothes
line the birds will plant whatever they like." smile

It took about 5 seconds for that to Sink-In blush


What I'm saying is, that's the reason we're plagued
with the like of Poison Ivy, Poke & Mulberry that
seem to plant themselves in every inaccessible fence
line, and hedgerow on God's Green Earth mad
Posted by: Pirate

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/04/13 05:50 AM

Causes loads of damage to the paint on vehicles too..
Posted by: Celandine

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/04/13 07:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Pirate
Causes loads of damage to the paint on vehicles too..

"...and that's the Truth!"
~Lily Tomlin~
Posted by: Mike

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/05/13 02:49 PM

Thanks! Pokeberry? I think the berries are poisonous....
Posted by: Mike

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/05/13 02:52 PM

"I had a huge stand of poke plants in my yard that no matter what I did to them they kept coming back"---

Yup, I cut them down in one spot but i guess the birds 'planted' some in another.
And now those I had cut down are back....
Posted by: MacBozo

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/05/13 02:57 PM

Nope! Different leaf, for one. Different variety? They grow wild around here.

Quick Google image search does confirm the ID. I grew up in the sticks, so my brother and I always knew not to eat them. Before they turn deep purple, they are bright pink/red. Wild "fruit" that is brightly colored is not to be eaten.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: For the Plant Experts? - 09/05/13 04:28 PM

Common Pokeweed Control

Manual removal for common pokeweed control requires the gardener to dig deeply and get out the entire taproot. Pulling is not successful as it leaves behind roots that will regenerate. If you do nothing else, remove the fruits from the plant before they spread. The plant can produce up to 48,000 seeds, which remain viable in soil for 40 years. Birds seem unbothered by the berry toxicity and enjoy the fruit, planting seeds wherever they are excreted.

It is usually necessary to use chemicals to control pokeweed as the taproot is fleshy and extends deep into the soil. Chemicals to control pokeweed work best when the plant is young. Apply glyphosate directly to the leaves of the plant to kill it. This acts through the vascular system and while it takes a while to see results, eventually the chemical reaches the roots. Other chemicals to control pokeweed are dicamba. Use spot applications on plants as they occur in your garden.

Like Poison Ivy, the best eradication is achieved mid-to-late fall when the plant is drawing down the chlorophyll into the root for the winter. This will cause the poison to be be drawn down into the storage roots. Reapply is it re-sprouts in the spring if necessary.

Follow the manufacturer's *SAFETY* Instructions and mixing, application, and disposal directions carefully! This is called "an understood contract" that the user enters into upon purchase. If you mess up --- You Can't Hold the Company At Fault.


Pokeweed.pdf