That was then.

Posted by: steveg

That was then. - 08/23/13 04:24 PM

Going through some old photo albums and came across some fading pics from '73 when I was in my last year at MassArt as a Graphic Design major. Just kicking back in my studio apt. — and the stuff in the background triggered a nostalgia tsunami.



I'm remembering the must-have tools of the trade back then (Sellers, you know what I'm talkin' about):

• 60" or 72" hollow core door straddling a pair of adjustable Charrette trestles
• 40" Charatex-coverd Mayline drafting board with precision sliding straight edge
• 100-pen AdMarker set
• A rotary pen & tool holder
• Pica ruler
• A sharpener for mechanical drafting pencils with a stab-me ring
• Xacto knife and #11 blades
• Rubber cement, thinner, and pickups (or a waxer if you were hi-tech)
• Non-repro blue pencils
• Gum erasers
• Set of RapidoGraph drafting pens
• Multi-roll clip-on tape dispenser
• Dozens of sheets of LetraSet
• Rolls of Rubylith and Amberlith
• Pads of trace and layout paper
• Stacks of illustration board
• Pantone color guides (they were cheap back then)
• And your big-ass portfolio

I compare that to today's digital tools and I realize how much fun I've been missing! cool
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 05:30 PM

Yeah, b!tch! Flat files!



and who is living in the past? laugh






I know I've saved a stack of Letraset that's in a box somewhere!

I keep my cutting mat & straight edges in the flat file because I use them frequently. I staged the rest, I had a box in the closet with all this stuff.

These were all from my Art Center days in the early '80s which taught me to be compulsive with my mechanical paste-ups, back when I spec'd phototype. I miss the smell of Bestine in the morning.


Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 05:44 PM

LOL! I stil have my % wheel, gum erasers, pickups, and circle templates. And I only got rid of the surviving AdMarkers a/b two years ago. Still use a roller and smoothing blocks. I have to build comps now and then, but they're inkjet printouts instead of marker layouts. But flat files? You must've been a rich kid. laugh
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 05:47 PM

Me desk at home right this instant? A hollow core door, sitting on two two-drawe file cabinets, with cinder blocks and lengths of board for my top-of-desk bookcase. Why fix what ain't broke.
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 05:55 PM

These modern-style flat files were bought for my first studio in 1985 from Flax Art Store. I bought two and stacked them. I think they were about $150 each. They still look great ... and I've had a place to keep all my posters and big drawings.

Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 05:57 PM

I thought I was going to catch you without a waxer, but nope.
You were truly a professional ! grin
Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:02 PM

I have to do "tours" of the art dept. every couple of weeks, and my favorite moment is explaining to them the Formatt (?) cut-out lettering. Letraset rub on were for wussies.
They actually gasp. ROFL!
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:12 PM

Originally Posted By: steveg
... But flat files? You must've been a rich kid. laugh


I see you in that picture, in your Danish Modern Recliner that only Trust Fund Art School students had … but MassArt?! ... the lounger probably was lifted from your parent's summer place in the Hamptons.

laugh

Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:17 PM

I should be so lucky... crazy
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Acumowchek
Letraset rub on were for wussies.


Art Center comp from 1981. I used 200pt Avante Garde Ex-Light burnished onto a gouache painting …. THERE"S ONLY ONE 'Q' ON THE SHEET! …. and at 4am with the caffeine shakes, if it transfers poorly I'd have screwed the painting I worked on for days and was due in about 5 hours.

We we heroes, dammit. laugh





Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:33 PM

LOL!
We used to go in the darkroom and photo transfer the vowels onto sticky back photo paper, because the "A"s were the first to go. I don't know if it was cheaper than buying new sheets, but that's the way we rolled. grin

Edit: Yes. You were heroes. It truly did take talent and skill to layout these projects.
$#$@#! young punks these days with their fancy typesettin' machines… wink
Posted by: Lea

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:42 PM


Meanwhile, back at the digital ranch?

I'd hit that. Just sayin' . . .

wink
LL
Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 06:51 PM

LOL!
Tease…
Posted by: MrB

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 07:04 PM

Interesting to see you guys looking back on older tools of your profession. I still have my enlarger I ought back in the early '80's. I had just bough a new house (new for me) and hired one of my photo students, a carpenter, to build a darkroom for me. From scratch and with my needs. The Enlarger is a Vivitar VI with dicloric color head. Loved that enlarger. It was too tall to fit on the work space of my darkroom so I had the carpenter cut out a section of the countertop and attach the enlarger directly to it to save an inch or so of height. Those times ti needed to go big and needed the height, I could lower that section of countertop. Worked like a charm.

Asi said , I still have that enlarger and head with lenses . I would give it away.

Ah the past

Dave
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 07:13 PM

Originally Posted By: Acumowchek
LOL!
We used to go in the darkroom and photo transfer...


In art school we used a local graphics house that made stats for us of finished art … they were moderately expensive. I inked a logo on illustration board, scratched/cleaned the edges, white out mistakes, etc … it would cost like $20 for them to put it under the camera and have a nice crisp black&white 8x10 photo print (ready the next day) …. then I'd spray mount it onto gray illustration board and tape a sheet of acetate over it. If I had time, I'd skip the tape & acetate and stop by the graphics house and pay them about $5 to shink-wrap it. This was the typical hoop to jump thru to show final projects in class, and it got expensive.

If I needed to apply the logo to a package design ( a bottle, carton, a book cover, a poster) I'd have to pay for these transfers called PMTs. They were like a letraset rub down of my original art, and they could be made in any pantone color. Those got really expensive and tragic if they didn't tranfer perfectly on the first try.

Those were the days.


Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 07:44 PM

Those were the days, indeed. I kinda miss them…
Another thing in my arsenal was rubylith tape, because we got tired of blocking out pinholes with a pen. grin
Posted by: Celandine

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 08:10 PM


DEAR GOD! I understood all that.

At the risk of sounding like the Monty Python
'4 Yorkshiremen' Sketch "Up-Hill! BOTH WAYS!"


As Illustrators, we weren't allowed all them fancy
schmancy mechanical drawing devices.

We weren't allowed eXacto Knives (We used single-edge
razor blades, not only for layouts, but to sharpen
our pencils ((along with a sandpaper block)).)
Nor Rapid-o-graphs... we used a ruling pen.

Fuk press on letters... we HAND Lettered everything.

Krikey Paulette had it even worse.. as a Fine Artist
she was made to make her own charcoal, grind her own
paints, and stretch her own canvases. frown

The only modern stuff we were allowed was Grumtine,
rubber cement thinner & all the Bestine we could eat,
kneaded erasers, a SS T-Square, a true edge drawing
board and a bigassed leather zipper portfolio.

What sux is after 40 years, I still have my tons of
equipment covering about 20 different methods & media
all stored in the attic and hall closet.

Shytes harder to part with than an obsolete Mac Collection. smirk
Posted by: Acumowchek

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 08:25 PM

Yep, I remember being jealous of people who had enlargers (Hmm… that didn't sound quite right).
I've got a good one for y'all. We used to sharpen our old x-acto blades, because the boss was too cheap to buy new ones! smile
Hand lettering was a way of life.
The first time we could 'bend' type, it was a miracle.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: That was then. - 08/23/13 08:32 PM


I didn't need an Enlarger
(I borrowed someone else's) wink
but I still use my Exacta.

Hand Lettering,
(Cue W.C.Fields)
"Ah, yes, the olde 'Basic Stroke!'"
(wait! that didn't sound right either blush )
Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 02:50 AM

Promises, promises... grin
Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 02:57 AM

Believe it or not, you can still get PMTs (or something similar), but they cost a bloody fortune. eek

I've got a little 6-panel brochure for a client that's gonna go to press next week. The printer I'm using just moved into huge, brand new SoA facility featuring the very latest in hi-tech presses and digital processes. The Dennis the Menace in me is thinking... Hmmm, I'm-a gonna bring this job to them as an old-school mechanical, complete with acetate overlays for color sep, and a tissue color-break top sheet. shocked Then I'm gonna bust a gut watching heads explode in the pre-press dept! laugh
Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 06:53 AM

Some hangers on.



BTW, that LetraSet burnisher is circa '75!
Posted by: NucleusG4

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 08:03 AM

Jeez.. you look so relaxed in that chair... not a care in the world.


WTF happened to that guy???
wink
Posted by: drjohn

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 08:16 AM

Originally Posted By: MrB


Asi said , I still have that enlarger and head with lenses . I would give it away.

Ah the past

Dave




Me too.
Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 08:33 AM

He got old. Old and cranky. You kids get off my lawn! grin
Posted by: garyW

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 09:07 AM

What the heck is that thing with a wood handle? A hole punch, heavy duty stapler, a '70s juicer?

Quote:
Posted by: MrB

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 09:23 AM

That do bring back memories.

When I think back on some of the "dark" rooms I created. The worst one I had was in the wooden shed we had by our mobile home in 1970. I portioned off a corner of it where I sat for all printing. The water source was by a garden hose coming from the trailer. Onetime in October, I accidently put my thermometer in the developer out there. It read 45 degrees. I just shook my head, got right up and never went back.

The ones after that were much better culminating in my palace type one I mentioned above. I told the carpenter I wanted an electrical outlet on every stud. And it hadits own circuit . It was absolutely dark, ventilated, cool and warm when needed. A photo student donated a couple of thick rubber Matts so it was comfortable to stand on. This was in my home. I wonder what the new owners have used that room for. Lots of storage though.

Dave
Posted by: steveg

Re: That was then. - 08/24/13 09:26 AM

Radiused corner cutter. Rounds the corners on mounting boards so they don't get dog-eared. Doesn't work as well on foam-core, so when I have a non-digital presentation, I mount the creative on black/black illustration board.
Posted by: lanovami

Re: That was then. - 09/22/13 06:31 PM

I am very late in this thread and it has nothing to do with the rest of it, but I like the stache Steve. Lookin good smile
Posted by: Pirate

Re: That was then. - 09/23/13 06:24 AM

One piece of equipment that I used that a lot of people didn't was a stablazation printer, ran the exposed paper thru this kinda automated thing that had three chemicals placed in it, it was great for down and dirty prints...and when I was shooting local stock car races..had one set up in an old chevy van for instant prints of the race.