Apple borrowing

Posted by: yoyo52

Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 09:21 AM

So what do you all think about Apple borrowing 17 billion so that it doesn't have to repatriate its off-shore cache of cash and pay taxes on it? Color me socialist, but I think it's shameful.
Posted by: Stumpy1

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 10:34 AM

I don't know a lot about it, but it sounds as bad as the fact that the computers are assembled overseas. frown
Posted by: garyW

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 11:19 AM

The Fed keeps interest rates at nearly zero percent, it's cheaper to borrow. Although Apple is sitting on $145 Billion in the bank, they save $9B dollars by going into debt for $17B. They're borrowing the $17B to pay their investors dividends. What corporate board of directors would not take this option if their #1 fiduciary responsibility is to their stockholders?

Corporations moving money off-shore is legal, and it shouldn't be. The laws have got to change.

Apple seems to be in headlines as if they're gaming the system but where have the headlines been since the mid-80s for every other corporation that actually does game the sytem. Just like Apple being in the headlines for using cheap labor in China while every other tech company does exactly the same. Why is it only with Apple the Wall Street Forbes crowd always find their moral compass?
Posted by: carp

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 01:27 PM

Right Gary,

I worked for the States largest Developer at one time - I was surprise that the developer never ever used their own money to build . Instead they borrowed money from the bank, under contract if schedules are met = 0% interest and the bank assumes the (risk) not the developer .
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 02:18 PM

I understand the economic motivation. I don't understand the victory of bottom line over patriotism--unless we all acknowledge that corporations have no allegiance at all to any state, only to their bottom lines. And if that's the case then corporations may be people, as the SCOTUS insists, but they are not citizens. smile
Posted by: Celandine

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 03:29 PM


When I read Steve Jobs' authorized biography, it
stated in part that Jobs had difficulty finding
American Manufacturers willing to supply products
(such as "Gorilla Glass" and the luxurious chromed
and meticulously curved aluminum cases we'd come
to expect as The Apple Standard) here in the US.
Whereas he'd go to China and say "Can you make
10 million units of xyz" and they'd say "SURE!"
and build a factory to do it. They were also the
only people who'd adhere to his maniacal attention
to detail... his insistence on Zen-Like elegance,
meticulously finished and polished components
that American manufacturers insisted "were never
meant to see the light of day!!!" cry

Gorilla Glass was originally developed by Corning,
but when they were approached, they said no...
they were not prepared to outfit for a run of a
product (that in their opinion) was destined to
fail. After all.. wth would pay $500 for a phone? crazy

So they, like IBM before them, gave him the go-
ahead, and the rest.... well you know. wink

Hard to feel sorry for short sighted arrogant aholez.

I understand that's how AT&T came to be the only
carrier on the block... they were the only ones
with enough footing "To Take A Chance".
Posted by: Leslie

Re: Apple borrowing - 05/04/13 04:23 PM

Originally Posted By: yoyo52
I understand the economic motivation. I don't understand the victory of bottom line over patriotism--unless we all acknowledge that corporations have no allegiance at all to any state, only to their bottom lines. And if that's the case then corporations may be people, as the SCOTUS insists, but they are not citizens. smile


Hear, hear!