The Bard

Posted by: Anonymous

The Bard - 02/04/02 09:44 PM

I have noted yoyo's sig and noticed others quoting Shakespeare quite a lot. I thought some favorite quotes might make a good thread. Mine is from Lear as well, just for the language if nothing else..."Tis hot, it smokes."<br><br>Have at it...<br><br>AlgæS
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 09:48 PM

I've got so many I wouldn't know where to stop. For economy of memorization, though, nothing beats Lear's "Never, never, never, never, never."<br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 09:55 PM

"Frodo lives!"<br><br>Weren't Will and JRR cousins?<br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:09 PM

In spirit, sure nuff.<br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:28 PM

Thank goodness. I was afraid I had the wrong "Bard." <br><br>The EDIT: Knew I had the wrong Bard? Possibly had the wrong Bard? Might have the wrong Bard? Perchance had the wrong Bard? Where's Shakespeare when I need him? <br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue><br><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by 128K_Mac on 02/05/02 01:32 AM (server time).</EM></FONT></P>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:38 PM

Of course if we're going for repetition how about this one by Will's wife?<br><br><br><br><br>(THE EDIT: I'm going to bed. I think I shifted into brain fade mode about 20 minutes ago......)<br><br><br>[color:red]128k_Mac[color:red]<br><br>[color:red]A rose is a rose is a rose....[color:red]<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by 128K_Mac on 02/05/02 01:40 AM (server time).</EM></FONT></P>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:44 PM

Will's wife in this case is really Hamlet's wife, mother, and aunt, Gertrude--Stein, that is <br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:46 PM

You forgot sister. Ms. Stein was very good as a sister.<br><br><br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/04/02 10:50 PM

Now that's a good wrinkle! I think she showed up in Sister Act, but everyone thought it was Whoopi Goldberg, who is actually Gertrude's uncle's third cousin four-times removed. Or was it fourth cousin three times removed? Can't recall, but I guess it doesn't matter as long as it's six degrees or less apart.<br><br>[Here the sound track breaks into a chorus of "We are the world," which fades slowly as I sink into sleep.]<br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/05/02 09:39 AM

Actually you outlasted me by 10 minutes or so it appears last night.<br><br>And what I had in mind at the time with my crack adding "sisters" to the fray I don't have a clue........brain fade........that ultimate and increasingly common affliction. :rolleyes:<br><br>Let the recollection of memorable words of The Bard begin, as envisioned by AlgaeScraper at the outset and I shall endeavor to keep my (not so) wise cracks out of this thread......but don't hold your breath.......<br><br>And it seems only fitting that I begin with:<br><br>"toil and trouble"....bubble, bubble, bubble as I head off to fetch my fourth cup of coffee............<br><br>(I surely had something in mind but what the devil was it???.....)<br><br>(Twas not Sister Act as that makes its entrance to my tired mind only when I am reminded of same......what was that play that Ms. Stein collaborated on in the 1920's when she visited the shores of her birth place? <br><br>First the coffee, then a check of the library......)<br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/05/02 09:43 AM

Now is the Winter of our Discontent made glorious summer by this son of York.<br><br><br>(nah, Steinbeck already used that one)<br><br>(where's the coffee?)<br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/05/02 11:26 AM

One I use often (too often) at the end of semesters comes from Richard II: "I wasted time and now doth time waste me."<br><br>For some unfathomable reason, students don't think that's funny <br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/05/02 02:43 PM

yoyo52<br><br>/meethinks you not only know the words of the Bard in Richard II too well, but have an evil and abiding satiric wit which might remind some of J. Swift.<br><br>"Switching Richards" from III to II only confuses me. And your students, sadly, are at great disadvantage in the face of your felicity as you pick apart their tired brains with wit of such sort at the time of examinations.<br><br>Can it be so long ago that you have forgotten their role? Have you no mercy? Their doleful failure to react clearly indicates they are beaten and brought down low, yet you mock them with words that even massive infusions of caffeine into their systems would likely benefit them little, if at all, were they to even consider retaliation.<br><br>How can they respond to such wit? Many of them, I suspect you'd agree, were brain dead when they enrolled in your course. The balance of the class members join them and are of similar mind at examination time.<br><br>Cruel, cruel, and evil wit!<br><br>(Would that I had just a modicum of such to rebut on their behalf.)<br><br>:rolleyes:<br><br><br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/05/02 08:44 PM

Well, I'm not too sure that most of the students that I have in Shakespeare are legally brain dead. Some of them are pretty lively, in fact.<br><br>They breathe in.<br><br>They breathe out.<br><br>Seriously, though, I have a lot of very good students, but also a lot of far too busy students. One thing that really amazes me is seeing a student running around with a date book or PDA, furiously scribbling down his/her next meeting or appointment. When I was in college, all I had to remember was when my classes met and when I had to show up at work. The kids at my school, and I think at a lot of schools, have a finger in every pie, and sometimes classes are the last item on that agenda.<br><br>And when they don't respond to Richard II, I put on a T-shirt that my sister-in-law sent me a few years ago. It's all black, except for white lettering that reads, "NO SNIVELING" <br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/06/02 01:23 PM

yoyo52,<br><br>My comment about 3rd or 4th year college students in your Shakespeare class was inappropriate. I have a good deal of respect for the qualifications of today's generation of undergraduates and if anyone was brain dead at the time of the message it was me.<br><br>I too often sink into reverie and relate everything to my own generation which: some evaded, some were students, some were non-students, some dodged, and some vacationed in Vietnam. <br><br>The "non-students" represented a fair portion of the undergraduate population at that time. College was a place to party and have fun, regardless of interests or aptitudes, but most importantly it was a means of evading draft classification "1A," if only temporarily.<br><br>Some, surprisingly, one way or another, made it to their third or four year before flunking out and slipping into the dreaded 1A class ("about to go on vacation") or evasion (dodger) mode. <br><br>If one happened to be a student, these non-students materially helped the grading curve, and they were as likely to major in English and take Shakespeare as major in Physics and study quarks and neutrons. Hence my comment. <br><br>(Glad I could come up with a brief explanation.) :rolleyes:<br><br><br>I am pleased, however, to learn that your students' lungs are getting sufficient oxygen. And, seriously, I do have a good deal of respect for today's students. I quite agree with you regarding their tech hardware. When I visit a campus I frequently see them with their backpacks (wish they'd been invented in the 1960's), although slung over their shoulder instead of the more useful intended position, which contains a laptop; MP3 player in their pocket (they're plugged in naturally); cell phone (sometimes two) on their belt or stuffed in their pocket(s); possibly a pager (now passee and being replaced by a second cell phone); and of course a PDA to schedule everything from their class assignments to parties to their sex lives.<br><br>I believe the entire generation, to agree with your comment, is baking many, many pies, certainly more than mine. All the technology has freed up so much time for them they're buried with activities and have no time.<br><br>Give anyone of today's generation a PDA and I think they could have engineered the Battle of the Gettysburg to end in half the time of the original event. You've noticed no doubt that we don't fight wars the old fashioned way much anymore, the events in Somalia popularized by Hollywood notwithstanding, we just out tech the enemy.<br><br>(With all due respect to those who died on both sides in Somalia.)<br><br>Which brings up the subject that I'll be gone to Europe for a bit with my dautInLaw visiting with my two sons who have a brief respite from recent events. Don't know if I've mentioned but their careers were interrupted due to their inane love of flying aeroplanes. They've each had a pilot's license since age 18 and have each owned a plane since age 21. That wasn't good enough, however, so they joined the Air Force Reserve to fly bigger and faster aeroplanes. <br><br>:rolleyes:<br><br>They didn't forget that they might have other obligations, they just weren't paying attention.<br><br>ditto<br><br>Am naturally taking my TiBook along, as is dautInLaw, as we have many things to download to same in their possession and hope to do a bit of email, but likely not many trips to the WWW.<br><br>Cheers<br><br>oh yes.....<br><br>My youngest son, the professor of Music, emailed the following to my dautInLaw several months ago and c.c.'d me so I might as well include something on topic:<br><br><br>That time of year thou mayest in me behold,<br>When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang<br>Upon these boughs which shake against the cold,<br>Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang,<br>In me thou see the twilight of such day<br>As after sunset fadeth in the west;<br>Which by and by black night doth take away,<br>Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.<br>In me thou see the glowing of such fire<br>That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,<br>As the death-bed whereon it must expire,<br>Consumed with that which it was nourished by.<br><br>This thou perceive, which makes they love more strong,<br>To love that well which thou must leave ere long.<br><br>I assume he wrote this from memory as I believe he's missed a word or two. I added more than a few of the Sonnets to my own memory bank during my vacation in Vietnam (albeit as a former student, not a former non-student). We therefore have some shared experiences.<br><br>Gotta run as dautInLaw and I have an important date at 7PM local tomorrow. It's been awhile. It's also been one of the major reasons, not explained as I recall, for my being "semi-retired" sinced 911. Other event was rather sad and not the sort of thing which would interest others.<br><br>(Am hopeful that the AirFrance bird will have "access" but agent didn't know. We'll see.....)<br><br>Cheers #2<br><br>PS: Please keep an eye on Uncle Billee for me while I'm gone. <br><br>[color:blue]128k_Mac</font color=blue><br><br>Men say they know many things; but lo! they have taken wings--The arts and sciences, and a thousand appliances; The wind that blows is all that any body knows. [color:blue]Henry David Thoreau</font color=blue>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Bard - 02/06/02 08:48 PM

Have fun. Enjoy brioche and café au lait. Enjoy your sons company most of all. I envy them their flying skills (I'm more in the Erica Jong camp--you know, "fear of flying"), although not their current position. Good luck to them and to you!<br><br>And that's true too.--Shakespeare, King Lear
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Bard - 02/06/02 09:06 PM

Have a good trip and don't forget your electric converters for the TiBook.<br><br>AlgæS