The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread

Posted by: SparkCollector

The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 12:54 AM

As long as we keep posting, it'll stay active, and hopefully busy.<br><br>I'll start it off with a recipe that's a combo between my ideas (the scallops) and my Mom's (the onions):<hr height=3 width= 87%>Honey Onions and Braised Scallops with Lemon and Ginger<br><br>2 lb [1 kg] Onions, peeled and sliced<br>2/3 cup [160 ml] butter<br>2/3 cup [160 ml] honey<br><br>Place sliced onions in a large shallow baking dish. Melt butter and honey in a small sauce pan, low heat, whisking till smooth and easily pourable. Drizzle evenly over the onions. Bake in preheated 350°F [175°C] oven—basting regularly—until golden brown, about 45 minutes to an hour.<br>-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br>While onions are baking (time the cooking of scallops to finish at same time as onions):<br><br>1 lb [500 gm] Sea Scallops (the 1.5 inch/35 mm size), rinsed, drained and patted dry with paper towels<br>2 Tbsp [30 ml] Olive Oil<br>1 Tbsp [15 ml] Butter<br>2 Tbsp [20 ml] fresh lemon juice<br>¼ cup [40 cc] fresh green onion (scallion) minced finely.<br>1 tsp [3.5 cc] ground ginger, fresh ground is best<br>Salt and and fresh-milled black pepper, to taste<br><br>In a measuring cup, combine lemon juice, ginger, scallion, salt and pepper. Keep nearby.<br><br>In a large skillet frying pan (I prefer my old, seasoned cast iron) heat pan over medium-high heat until a drop of water dances and evaporates. Turn down to medium-low and add olive oil and butter. Heat until it starts smoking just a little bit. Carefully place scallops into pan, in one layer. Very lightly brown one side, moving them about the pan when they start to firm up for even heating, lift with tongs to check the undersides. When just slightly browned, turn scallops over and brown the same amount. This whole process of cooking and lightly browning the scallops on both sides should only take about 4-5 minutes, tops.<br><br>While the second side of the scallops are browning, use bulb baster to extract about 1/4 cup [60 ml] of honey/lemon mixture from the dish the onions are baking in and combine with the lemon/ginger/scallion mixture in the measuring cup. Brush mixture over top of scallops, when second side of scallops are lightly browned, flip over again brush more of the mixture. After about 30 seconds, remove from heat, and then immediately transfer scallops to a heated dish. It's very important to not over cook the scallops or they'll become tough.<br><br>At this point, if your timing is good, the onions should also be done to a nice golden brown, caramelized nicely.<br><br>Serve scallops on a bed of the honey onions, garnish with thin orange slices and spicy radish curlicues. <br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 06:55 AM

Scallops ~ what a classy way to start. I swear, the aroma suggested by your recipe is so dreamy. We're lucky, like anybody living near a coast, to have pretty sure access to fresh scallops. I'm partial to the huge "diver" vaiety.<br><br>It's really important, novice scallop chefs, not to overcook these babies. Sparky's technique should give you a beautiful browned "outside," while the interior is ideally firm, yet almost creamy. <br><br>I've got a recipe for King Ranch Chicken. It makes the kitchen smell delicious, it's beautiful a serve and it puts folks into a good mood food coma. Texas Soul Food in a cassarole dish.<br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 06:59 AM

I love scallops. Thanks!<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 09:21 AM

Any time you're ready to post that King Ranch Chicken recipe, Lea, I'm ready with the Command + A,C,V!<br><br>And if anybody tries the Scallops & Onions, lets us know what you think!<br><br>Pictures, Carp! <br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 09:59 AM

And for dessert:<br><br>ADVOCAAT (DUTCH EGGNOG)<br> <br> Serving Size : 12<br> <br> Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br> -------- ------------ --------------------------------<br> 10 Eggs<br> 1/2 Level teaspoon salt<br> 275 g Sugar<br> 4 dl Cognac - dl = half litre<br> 1 1/2 level teaspoons vanilla<br> -essence (extract, I think)<br> <br> Separate the eggs and beat the yolks with the salt and the sugar, until the<br> mixture is thick and creamy. Beat in the cognac, very slowly and put the<br> mixture into a double saucepan. Heat gently, whisking all the time until<br> the advocaat is warm (not hot) and thick. Remove the pan from the heat and<br> stir in the vanilla essence. Pour into a jug. Advocaat is served in a glass<br> and eaten with a teaspoon. It can also be topped with whipped cream.<br><br>Sorry about the mix of measuring formats; it's a conundrum. <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 10:12 AM

Not a big fan of Egg Nog, but maybe I could just have one of those bottles of Cognac, and maybe you could pack in a few Cohibas when you send the package, right?<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 12:48 PM

Oops! Apologies for the inconsistency in measurement conversions between Tbsp & ml in the scallop's butter & lemon juice quantities.<br><br>2 US Tablespoons = 29.6 (30) ml.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:04 PM

I often wonder if the authors of some recipes mix up the measures to mess with our heads!?! <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:30 PM

I had a "friend" (ahem) who did that on purpose. She was a fantastic cook, always willing to share a recipe. It took the rest of us a couple of years to figure it out that not one of us could duplicate any of her dishes from her written recipes.<br><br>She wasn't dyslexic either, she taught HS. I never really liked her anyway.<br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:37 PM

I think I'll try that eggnog at Christmas time. Sounds yummy!!!<br><br>Only one problem.... Serving size : 12 ..... tasters : 1<br><br>Oh well, it's okay to get a bit blotto from time to time. <br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:39 PM

tasters : 2 <br><br>What... Melly doesn't like boozed up eggnog?<br><br>tasters : 3 <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:45 PM

Mel doesn't like Cognac.<br><br>Tasters : 2 <br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/07/07 03:49 PM

We won't tell her.<br><br>tasters : 3 <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 01:03 PM

Bring on the King Ranch Chicken, FLANG BLAMMIT!<br><br><br>I have a tray full of skinless, boneless thighs that are just begging for something besides my usual oven baked crushed pecan coating.<br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 01:41 PM

God help me I will post a lobster dish soon if I do not get deleted.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 03:33 PM

We usually put barbecue sauce on our chicken and grill it.<br><br><br><br><br>my beer blog<br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 03:50 PM

<OL><B>"God help me I will post a lobster dish soon if I do not get deleted."</B></OL>Then get on it quick, big Daddy! Add it to the flow...<br><br>
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 04:32 PM

Maybe someone would create a pdf cook or sorts that the forum member can add too?<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 04:38 PM

This is as good a place as any, Carp.<br><br>And then, cranking out a PDF from the gathered goodies here would be easy enough.<br><br>Whaddaya got?<br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 04:44 PM

He's gotta figure out what really is hiding under that egg that looks like a cheese biscuit.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 04:59 PM

<br>We came up "Empty" on figuring out those fried pepper dough goodies<br>but I was told that it MAY be found in the SHARED RECIPE FILES in EPICURIOUS<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 05:14 PM

Well, I found out the "kanagel" baker's name—"Esther Lewis"—and I also found out that she stops in the pub up the street to have dinner with her husband about once a week.<br><br>I left my name and phone number and a really sweet/insistent message about getting the recipe. We'll see what becomes of it.<br><br>Fingers crossed!<br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 05:30 PM

If there are any fans of Cuban food here's a very easy recipe for you, cheap but tasty.<br><br>1lb. of very lean hamburger<br>1 cup of dry cooking wine (for echt flavor, get this)<br>1 small can (8 oz.) of tomato sauce<br>pimento-stuffed green olives, sliced<br>1 tsp. cumin<br>1 tbs. oregano<br>dash or two of ground cayenne red pepper<br>salt and ground black pepper to taste<br>some people like to add a handful of raisins (I would but my wife doesn't like 'em )<br><br>Mix all this stuff together thoroughly.<br><br>Meanwhile, in a frying pan, sauté one medium onion, diced, and several cloves of garlic, also diced, in some bacon grease if you have it handy, or in a small amount olive oil.<br><br>When the onions are wilted, lower the heat to medium or less and throw in the meat mixture. Stir the mix for a couple of minutes until it's all happily bubbling away, and then let it simmer until the meat is thoroughly cooked.<br><br>Serve it with rice and, if you really want to be Cuban, with super-ripe fried plantains (I mean really ripe, boys and girls, like you're tempted to throw the plantain away cause it looks too black--that's when it's at its sweetest). Forget vegetables. We don't do no steekin' vegetables.<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 05:36 PM

Sounds good! I wish plantain wasn't so darn expensive in Toronto. My southern travels have given me a taste for it.<br><br>Do you serve your rice with freshly chopped cilantro in it?<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 05:50 PM

Nice one, YoYo...<br><br>THAT'S!!! what I'm talkin' about here, kids!<br><br>It sounds pretty easy—even for novices—and very tasty (I'd add the raisins )<br><br>We need a ton of replies like this.<br><br>Is there a name for that recipe?<br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 08:09 PM

It's called picadillo--not to be confused with pecadillo, although if you get a taste for picadillo it might become a pecadillo <br><br>And no, Marg, we don't normally put cilantro in the rice, but I do love cilantro.<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 08:30 PM

I bought plantains once, but had no clue about them.<br><br>I tried to use them before they were ripe, and they were just acrid. I TOTALLY didn't understand their use.<br><br>Then I had a beef-n-plantain-over-rice dish at a local restaurant.<br><br>And I understood.<br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 08:46 PM

If you cook the plantain when it's green, it's completely different from what you get when you cook it when it's ripe. The way to cook them when they're green is like this.<br><br>Cut the plantain into chunks about an inch thick. Deep fry them in hot vegetable oil. When they begin to turn golden, take them out, then squash them down so they're about half an inch or so thick. Then dump them back into the hot oil and let them fry until they brown. Salt 'em and eat 'em. That's called platano chatino. You can also use the green plantain the same way you would a potato that you're going to mash. That's called fufu de platano verde. I never liked them that way, though, so I've never made it. And you can also slice the plantain really thin, potato chip thin, and fry them up--called chicharritas. You can find bags of chicharritas at most markets nowadays, at least in the northeast and FL. Don't know about the left coast, which is more influenced by Mexican than by Caribbean cuisine.<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 08:54 PM

The whole plantain thing is pure-white new to me.<br><br>I love bananas—for their flavor, their texture and their nutrient content—and I can totally understand the importance and use of plantains as a staple unit of cooking, much like the way we Eurocrappers have used potatoes.<br><br>I can use my third-eye tastebuds to imagine plantains being made into sweet, spicy and savory dishes. But I just never knew much about them before a year ago or so.<br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 09:18 PM

A Jasper White Recipe I have used for lobster many times here. at least it is close to his cookbook in my kitchen.<br><br>I wrote this up over at MCF years ago:<br><br>Chik lobsters pound and a quarter to pound and a half are fine. Things get out of control if too much lobster at one time. I made this for four once and we did the whole thing two lobsters at a time. (Too much work and wine consumed before the finish, never again). <br><br>This guy is right, the 1/4 cup bourbon (which is cooked off) is key. I use Wild Turkey. (Chef gets one too). <br>The 1/4 cup white wine we use our house jug wine, Cribari Bianco (9.95/gallon) but any dry white will do. <br><br>This one boils the claws. We never did that but not a bad idea because they are the last thing to be done. May help deciding whether done or not. <br>Cutting up the lobster: we do what this one does but we do not throw the head away! keep everything in there. I remove the brain but leave any green or egg masses in the lobster. great flavoring. If any of the diners are squeamish I would take all the green and egg masses and toss them into a saute pan with a little butter and saute up as a side dish (splash of white wine). I love this stuff. <br>Crack open the claws and all the joints. (Whack with a mallet). The body is cut down the middle and so is the tail. (I think by cracking the claws and if they are small this is how you can omit the boiling of the claws. <br><br>We add a little tarragon along with the chervil and chives. <br><br>I would omit the "season with salt and pepper". Maybe if you boil the claws you need to do this but I would boil them in salt water (150millimolar NaCl) sheesh I used to make this in the lab. Small handful of salt to two gallons boil. <br><br><br><br>The preceding picture was when I lit the bourbon. Do turn off the lights, it's fun. <br><br>This is one of the more pain in the ass recipes but if you get everything in there it is going to be good. don't freak about the cooking time. With the wine, bourbon in there you can't overcook it. (But don't go overboard. <br><br>Last hint. This recipe says wait till shells blacken when under broiler. Depending on distance from the broiler and the pan this can go either way. If shelf setting makes you squeeze it all in allow for a touch of blackening. But if the distance is large just let some of the red shell start to change to brown. <br><br>Last last hint: lobster is so good I serve only french bread with it for sopping up all those weird things that fall out of the body. A little butter and fresh garlic in the bread and put it on the bottom shelf when you do the broiling. You could serve salad and corn on the cob with it but its just a distraction from the main event. <br><br>Hardest part: find the chervil. This may not seem like a break item because there really isn't too much to chervil but we've tried it without and there is a little flavor missing. It combos with the cooked off bourbon very well.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 09:31 PM

Mmmmmmmm.........<br><br>I love the butter, but if I have too much it gets my gut bubbling uncomfortably. That's why—when I go on a rare clam feast—i dip in vinegar or hot sauce insted.<br><br>I'm a fan of King Crab and I think the prep and consumption is very similar to what you've described.<br><br>But i really need to spend the money and lay in a set of 4-6 stainless steel surgical scissors.<br><br>Nutcrackers, mallets, picks and little forks and all that are OK, but the best tool would HAVE to be a great pair of surgical scissors.<br><br>
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 09:48 PM

[color:blue]This is as good a place as any, Carp.<br><br>And then, cranking out a PDF from the gathered goodies here would be easy enough.<br><br>Whaddaya got?</font color=blue><br><br>There was a quest some years ago that someone would create a forum cook book in a "pdf" form that members could submit menus or recipes too with images, links, video yada yada <-- this volunteer would collect and publish the book in "pdf" and post it somewhere for members to download to print what they wanted<br><br>Sorta like a Mosaic of lore but only stacked like a book. But who has the dedication for such a project ?<br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 09:53 PM

I've got a pair of surgical scissors which go on the table whenever we have lobster. long handles and short throw on the scissor part and blunt. I think they are for stripping dressings or something but they go right through lobster.<br><br>My main way of cooking lobster is much simpler:<br><br>Preheat gas grill to med high.<br>Half stick of butter, microwave and stir until liquid in small bowl.<br><br>Take some live lobsters and quickly remove their brains by knife point. That would make them not live. Then split them on their back from brain to end of tail making sure to slice tail right down the middle.<br><br>Remove lungs and brain and discard. <br>Remove roe and any tomale (green) and drop in the butter bowl. When I pic them out I try to select females so I get roe but it is surprising how many meat countermen do not know how to sex a lobster.<br>Fork stir contents. A clove of garlic smashed is optional into butter.<br><br>Lay the lobsters open and crack all other parts open, claws, joints. (The surgical scissors are handy here.)<br>Now drizzle the butter mixture into the cracks and crevices opened and the rest goes into the body cavity.<br><br>This is all really easy and can be done by the time the grill is hot. <br>Lay the lobsters on the grill and close. Take a peek in 8 minutes for 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 pound lobsters. The little legs will get charred a bit, the lobster will be bright red and the tell tale for done is the mixture is just starting to bubble in the body cavity. No more than 12 minutes.<br><br>Grilled lobster is so much better than boiled. Boiled takes all that lobster flavor and washes it away. <br><br>Now that I think of it I don't know why I don't drizzle some Wild Turkey on at the last moment like Jasper's recipe and light it. I might try that this weekend.<br><br>The hard shell Maine lobster hits it's peak from here to November 15. Sweeter more dense meat than what you get in the summer. I love to grill lobster in the winter.<br><br><br>Now I'm hungry.<br><br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/09/07 09:57 PM

<OL><B>"But who has the dedication for such a project ?<br>"</B></OL>As long as this thread keeps going, and gets populated by great recipes, I'll be happy to administer the project. But the thing is, it isn't going to happen within a set period of time the way the Mosaic happened. The point is to keep ALL recipes and discussion about them in this thread, so it continually pops to the top of the thread index and keeps getting new input.<br><br>You KNOW I'll be keeping an eye on it. If a decent collection gathers, I'll start building a PDF.<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 04:32 AM

<br>Sawmill Sausage Gravy<br><br>"A thick milk gravy.<br>Serve on biscuits with sausage & eggs."<br><br>Original recipe yield:<br>4 servings<br>PREP TIME 20 Min<br>COOK TIME 15 Min<br>READY IN 35 Min<br><br>INGREDIENTS:<br><br>* 1 pound ground pork sausage (hot or sweet)<br>* 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour<br>* 3 tablespoons butter<br>* 1/2 cup finely chopped onions<br>* 1 small garlic clove (crushed)<br>* 1 teaspoon chicken boulion (1 cube -crushed)<br>* 1 teaspoon parsley<br>* 1 teaspoon sage<br>* 1/4 teaspoon thyme<br>* 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper<br>* 1 pinch tarragon<br>* 2 cups milk<br><br>DIRECTIONS:<br><br>1. Place sausage in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium heat until evenly brown. Drain.<br>2. Add pepper & butter, chopped onions & garlic and cook until tender.<br>3. Combine Flour, boulion, sage, & thyme.<br>4. Sift flour mixture slowly over sausage mixture, and cook gently for 5 min.<br>stirring constantly, until flour is brown.<br>5. Gradually stir in milk, 1/2 cup at a time and cook until thickened.<br>6. Stir in parsley & tarragon.<br>7. Add more milk if necessary to achieve preferred consistency.<br><br><br>Serve over Southern Style Buttermilk Biscuits along with with extra sausage.<br><br><br><br>Grandma's Biscuits<br><br>Old-fashioned Southern Buttermilk Biscuit recipe.<br><br>INGREDIENTS:<br><br>* 2 cups All Purpose flour<br>* 1 teaspoon salt<br>* 3 teaspoons baking powder<br>* 1 teaspoon sugar (optional)<br>* 6 tablespoons lard or shortening<br>* 2/3 cup buttermilk<br><br>PREPARATION:<br><br>1. Mix dry ingredients together; cut in lard or shortening until it’s the consistency of coarse meal.<br>2. Slowly blend in milk, just until dry ingredients are moistened.<br>3. Work BRIEFLY w/hands until blended (too much handling makes them tough) Mounding, splitting the dough in half vertically, and stacking it on top of mound, and mashing down, repeating several times results in flaky biscuits that split easily when they’re cooked.<br>4. Pat the dough out on floured cloth or surface to about 1/2-inch thick.<br>(Do not roll too thin.) Cut with floured biscuit cutter or glass tumbler.<br><br>Place on ungreased baking sheet and bake at 400° 8 minutes or until golden brown, then shut off oven & allow them to finish up for the last 2-4 minutes.<br>This results in biscuits that are golden on top, moist but well done inside, but not burned on the bottom.<br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 04:43 AM

The Ticos put cilantro in everything. I got into the habit too when I stayed there. I would even add cilantro to your hamburger recipe as well as the rice. Try it sometime.<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 04:46 AM

PO-LEEEEZE Post a "HOW-TO" for how to prepare Fried Bananas (Plantains?)<br>I used to buy them from street-venders in NYCity wrapped in waxed paper.<br>You'd just peel down the waxed paper as you went, and eat the sticky contents<br>as if you were eating a large candy bar. <br><br>I came to miss, and utterly CRAVE the dumbed things, and have attempted to<br>prepare them a few times, with mostly miserable results.<br><br>Reading the above post, I think I may have been cooking them before they were<br>ripe enough, because they were very hard & starchy, more like a potatoe than<br>a banana... but when I tried my dark-rum & butter recipe with green finger-<br>bananas I had somewhat better results, ...umm... 'close but no Cuban cigar' <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 08:56 AM

OK, my first official formatted entry:<br><br>(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)<br>Jasper White's Pan Roasted Lobster<br><br>2 Live; (1 3/4 to 1 1/2 pound) hard shell lobster<br>2 tablespoon Peanut oil<br>2 Shallots; finely diced<br>¼ cup Wild Turkey or any decent Bourbon<br>2 tablespoon Dry white wine; ( a Pinot Grigio worth drinking with the lobster or something dry and snappy with no oak.)<br>6 tablespoon Unsalted butter; cut into small pieces and chilled<br>1 tablespoon Finely chopped fresh chervil<br>1 tablespoon Finely chopped fresh chives<br>Kosher or sea salt; to taste<br>Freshly ground pepper; to taste<br><br>One loaf French Bread. Forget the veggies, sides and salad this is wine and lobster.<br><br>Preheat the broiler to as hot as possible. Cheat by turning your oven to as high as possible then switch over to broil. Want that sucker hot.<br>Position the oven rack in the upper third of the oven. You may to shorten the cooking time slightly if the broiler rack is close to the heat. <br>Quarter the lobsters, removing the tomalley and the roe if present. (Buy girl lobsters if possible.) Crack the shells of the claws. Place the pieces of lobster, shell side down, on a plate. Place the tomalley and roe in a small bowl. With a fork, break them into small pieces. Cover. Place a heavy 12-inch (or bigger) saute pan over the highest heat possible. Allow the pan to heat for 3 to 5 minutes until it becomes extremely hot. Add the oil and heat until it forms a film on the surface of the pan. Slide the lobster pieces, shell side down, into the hot oil. Using tongs, move the pieces in order to evenly sear all the shells. Because the lobster pieces are not flat, you will need to hold them with the tongs and press the shells into the hot oil to accomplish this. When the shells have all turned bright red, which should take no longer than 2* minutes, turn the pieces over. The oil will also have taken on a beautiful red tinge. Add the tomalley and roe into the pan. Place the pan in the oven. If using the broiler, cook 2** minutes. The shells should be slightly browned, even a bit charred in places. Remove the pan from the oven and return it to the stove at maximum heat. Turn off the oven and put your plates in to warm. This will take only a minute. Warning: The handle of the pan will be red hot and will stay hot until the dish is complete. To avoid burns, wear oven mitts from now until the dish is complete. Add the shallots to the fat in the pan and stir. Add the bourbon and ignite. Shake the pan until the flames die down.<br><br><br>Wild Turkey burning off. Hot handle!!!<br><br> Add the wine and let liquids in the pan reduce until the pan is almost dry. Turn the heat to low. Quickly remove the pieces of lobster and place, shell side down, on warm plates. Return the pan to the heat and add the butter, chervil, and chives. Swirl or stir the butter into the pan to create a creamy sauce with the pan juices. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Use very little salt, if any, because the lobster adds its own salt. Spoon the sauce*** over the lobster pieces and serve at once. <br><br>* 2 minutes seems too short but the lobster will be hit again. Just watch for that red tinge in the oil and make sure all shells have had a turn on the bottom to turn red.<br><br>** The broiler 2 minutes I sometimes extend if too much lobster or broiler isn't cranked. Trying to imitate a 600 degree restaurant broiler is tough at home.<br><br>*** This creamy sauce is what all the work was for. The bourbon, wine, chervil and chives makes for an amazing sauce. This is where a little French bread to make you plates shiny getting every drop is crucial.<br><br>So French bread, some snappy Pinot Grigio and do not eat delicately. The sauce and shell will be all over your wine glasses, your eyeglasses and your smiling face as you toast luciferase but especially Jasper White since this is his with with few modifications. He serves this daily at Jasper White's Summer Shack here in Boston now in four places. I only go to the original Cambridge restaurant which used to be "The Tiki Hut"<br><br>(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)(__x__)<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 03:48 PM

I use brown rice, Marg. My father, who among other things ran a rice mill, would kill me.<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 03:57 PM

Thanks for starting this! I'm cutting and pasting as we speak.<br><br>my beer blog<br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 04:01 PM

I'm trying this soon.<br><br>I had plantains in Uganda. They boiled them like potatoes and I loved them!<br><br>my beer blog<br>
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/10/07 09:31 PM

[color:blue]You KNOW I'll be keeping an eye on it. If a decent collection gathers, I'll start building a PDF.</font color=blue><br><br>Great Sparky that you would step up and take such a project - should be fun and easy to do at the administrators time to assemble <-- no deadlines.<br><br>Maybe to make it easier for members to search for a thread easier and for the assembler as well, fashion a thread like a typical table of contents in any cook book. Otherwise this thread would get really long<br><br>1 - MM Chicken<br>2 - MM Seafood<br>3 - MM BBQ<br>4 - MM Meat<br>5 - MM Salads<br><br>Just an idea but its your "football" make a touchdown <br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 08:04 AM

Screen Shot from a PDF I started (and got stalled on) ages ago.<br><br>Everybody makes potato salad, and we've all had many different versions. This one is particularly good.<br><br><img src=http://home.comcast.net/~sparkcollector/bbs/redpotatosalad.gif border=1><br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 11:36 AM

I grew up on the potato salad you have listed. Then I marry someone who grew up on German Potato Salad. Think German Apple pickers in Virginia. I just grabbed a list of ingredients off the net that sound about right.<br><br>4 potatoes<br>4 slices bacon<br>1 tablespoon all-purpose flour<br>2 tablespoons white sugar<br>1/3 cup water<br>1/4 cup white wine vinegar<br>1/2 cup chopped green onions<br>salt and pepper to taste<br><br>or<br><br> 3 pounds new potatoes <br>1 yellow onion, quartered <br>1/2 pound bacon, diced <br>1 large red onion, diced <br>3/4 cup cider vinegar <br>1 tablespoon mustard seeds <br>1/4 cup canola oil <br>Salt and freshly ground pepper <br>8 green onions, thinly sliced <br>1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves<br><br>We get the bacon at Smokehouse.com It is the bacon and the vinegar that really put it over the top.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 11:47 AM

Well, alright then! <br><br>Schwäbischer Kartoffelsalat nach Art der Tante Hilde  <br><br>Zutaten: <br><br>1 kg Kartoffeln <br>1 Zwiebel; gerieben oder gehackt <br>1 EL Fleischbrühe-Pulver <br>1 EL Essig <br>3 EL Öl <br>50 ml heisses Wasser <br>Salz, Pfeffer <br>Flüssigwürze, z.B. Maggi <br><br>Ein wirklich guter schwäbischer Kartoffelsalat gelingt nicht allen, weil sehr viele Regeln zu beachten sind. Diese Variante aber ist ein Phänomen. Sämtliche angeblichen Todsünden werden hier begangen, trotzdem gelingt er immer und schmeckt immer genau wie er schmecken soll. <br><br>Die Kartoffeln garkochen, in noch warmem Zustand in gleichmäßig dünne Scheiben schneiden und in eine Salatschüssel geben. <br><br>Nun werden in praktisch beliebiger Reihenfolge die übrigen Zutaten auf die Kartoffelscheiben gegeben und anschliessend der Salat durchgemischt, aber Vorsicht, dass die Kartoffelscheiben wegen der Optik dabei nicht zu sehr zerbrechen. Die Wassermenge richtet sich in hohem Masse nach der verwendeten Kartoffelsorte. Der Salat darf weder zu trocken noch zu flüssig werden. Als Kriterium dafür gilt, dass der Salat beim Umrühren 'schwätzen' muss, d.h. er muss regelrecht quietschen. Wer Zwiebeln nicht so gerne roh isst, kann sie gerne auch zerreiben. Mit Flüssigwürze, Salz und Pfeffer abschmecken. <br><br>Der Salat kann sowohl noch lauwarm als auch zimmerwarm gegessen werden, sollte aber nicht älter als ca. 3-4 Stunden sein.<br><br><br>- alec -
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 11:51 AM

Yup, Poly...my Dad used to make a very similar German Potato Salad, and it was meant to be eaten warm. Since he died, I haven't had it, because he never wrote the recipe down.<br><br><strike>I think I'll have to try yours, to see how close it is.</Strike> I'll see if I can bring my skills to bear to figure out how all those ingredients are supposed to go together. By the way...here's a bunch of wood and nails and plumbing stuff and wires and sh¡t. Build a new house for yourself, eh? <br><br>
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 11:57 AM

Does it taste like chicken?<br><br>
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 12:28 PM

Plan on trying this soon. I might need an additional taster. <br><br>Clamato Caldo Verde<br><br>Ingredients:<br><br>1 medium onion, chopped<br>1 clove garlic, minced<br>4 potatoes, peeled and diced<br>3 cups Clamato<br>3 cups chicken broth or water<br>8 oz chorizo, crumbled<br>1 bunch collards, kale or other green, shredded<br>1 lb. large cooked shrimp<br><br>Preparation:<br><br>1. Heat a large saucepan on medium-high. Saute&#8242; the onion and garlic in a little oil for about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and saute&#8242; for another 2 - 3 minutes.<br>Add Clamato and broth, cover and let simmer for 20 minutes<br><br>2. While potatoes simmer, heat a skillet and saute&#8242; chorizo for about 10 minutes. Drain fat and reserve.<br><br>3. When potatoes are soft, mash them in the pan then add the chorizo and greens.<br>Season with salt and pepper and let simmer another 10 minutes. Add shrimp and let heat through.<br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 12:37 PM

Let me get the recipe from the source tonight verbally. Yes, it is served warm and the crunchy salty thick sliced bacon in there with the vinegar is just lights out. Before my father in law died he kept us in sweet peppy crispy pickles that were perfect all chopped up in this. That pickling recipe we still do have and we make a years worth every fall. The father in law also did pickled peaches which we have never been able to reproduce. Half of one of those and some country ham would make you weep that you couldn't eat it every night. (I suppose you could but sugar salt intake would be a wee bit high.)<br><br>This reminds me, it's almost time to start pickling.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 01:26 PM

"Does it taste like chicken?"<br><br>Nein, schmekt es wie Kartoffelsalat! <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 05:14 PM

Mais bien sûr!<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 10:32 PM

Yeah thats the "pdfs" maybe add photos of the dish or how or links too video on the menu page.<br><br>Ranch Style Potato Salad - serves six to eight - My original recipe <br><br>6 whole Russet potatoes <br>1 - Small Red onion coarsely chopped<br>1 - Sprig of minced Parsley <br>1/4 jar of imitation Bacon Bits "flake" type<br>1/2 table spoon ground mustard "Colemans"<br>2 - boiled eggs grated <br>1/2 carrot shredded<br>3 - dash of Lea & Perrins Worcester Sauce <br>1 - quart Best Foods Mayo<br>Celery salt to taste<br>White Pepper to taste<br>Sprinkle Paprika for color<br><br>Steps<br>1 - Wrap potatoes with foil and bake or brush with olive oil with no wrapper - Fridgerate potatoes over night <- important<br><br>2 - Cube potatoes "small size" with skin on into a bowl<br><br>3 - Combine into bowl - Red onions - minced parsley - bacon bits - ground mustard - 1 boiled egg - shredded carrot - Lea & Perrins Worcester Sauce - celery salt - white pepper. <- important<br><br>4 - Mix the bowl "by hand" don't use spoons, wear plastic food prep gloves and "toss" too combine the ingredients <- important<br><br>5 - Let the combination stand for 2 hours in fridge<br><br>6 - Remove from frigerator and add the jar of mayo - use food prep plastic gloves to massage the mayo into the salad, should be wet with mayo <-- important because the "baked" potatoes will absorb the mayo compared to the boiled ones that absorb water from boiling.<br><br>7 - Place salad into "presentation bowl"<br><br>8 - Top salad off with paprika - the remaining 1 grated egg and then rim the bowl with parsley sprigs <br><br>9 - Chill for an hour then serve <br><br>Whats "unique" about this salad is that the potatoes are "baked" not boiled which gives a different texture and flavor over boiled - This salad (should) have at the end a bake potato, bacon, steak flavor with a tang to it.<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/11/07 11:59 PM

Imitation "Bacon" bits?<br><br>I don't think so.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/12/07 08:46 AM

LOL - well for those who are on low fat , you can use the real ones<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/12/07 09:08 AM

What's kind of funny, Carp, is that you talk about substituting low fat imitation bacon bits, yet the recipe has a <B><I>quart</B></I> of mayonnaise.<br><br>Dude, it's Potato Salad. It's not supposed to be particularly heathful.<br><br>Using fake bacon in that recipe makes as much sense to me as somebody ordering Bacardi 151 and Diet Coke.<br><br> <br><br>
Posted by: margadagio

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/12/07 09:31 AM

The chemicals they throw in that fake stuff will kill you long before any fat will. <br><br>
Posted by: carp

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/12/07 10:29 PM

Well might not be a whole "quart" you kinda have to feel it out on how dry you want it.<br><br>Keep in mind that "baked" vs "Boiled" the baked is dryer and will absorb more mayo as opposed of the boiled in water ones. The baked potatoes do have a different texture and flavor which makes this salad different.<br><br>Now I don't have a "fat calculator"<br>But imitation bacon with more mayo -vs- Real fat bacon with less mayo ? ?<br><br>Anyway my entry recipe was not trying to win any weight loss awards.<br><br>
Posted by: SparkCollector

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/13/07 12:52 AM

<OL><B>"Anyway my entry recipe was not trying to win any weight loss awards."</B></OL>Then why bother with the "Fakon" bits?<br><br>See what I'm getting at?<br><br>IMO, the more you can use natural ingredients in ANY recipe, the better.<br><br>And BTW...I have had a potato salad made with baked potatoes (once, MANY years ago), and you're right: They DO impart a really nice flavor compared to boiled potatoes.<br><br>I suppose any potato salad recipe could be altered to use baked spuds. That's the fun of kitchen experimentation!<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/15/07 07:50 PM

King Ranch Chicken<br><br><br>Chicken pieces ~ A big breast, a fat thigh, a couple of legs. (Leave that skin on. This isn't health food), carrots, celery and yellow onion<br><br>Cumin<br>Sage<br>Bay leaf<br>Garlic powder<br>Salt and pepper<br><br>Corn tortillas ~ fresh, if you can get 'em, packaged works just fine<br>More yellow onion<br>Cheddar cheese (Don't use the "already shredded" stuff)<br>Cream of mushroom soup<br>Cream of chicken soup<br>Rotels (This is a brand of canned tomatoes. You want "Original.)<br>Jalapeño peppers, the sliced and in a glass jar variety<br><br><br>Simmer the chicken with chopped veggies in just enough water to cover. Spice heavy to taste, don't be shy and don't skimp on the cumin or sage. <br><br>When the chicken's done, fish it out to cool. Let the broth simmer for another half hour. Longer doesn't hurt.<br><br>While the chicken's cooling: Quarter 8-10 tortillas (put 'em in a baggie, they dry out really quick). Course chop a cup of more sweet onion and finely chop half a dozen jalapeño slices. In a big mixing bowl, combine half a can of each soup and the Rotels (but not their "juice").<br><br>Put on some good music, pop a beer and pick the chicken off the bone, hand shred as you work (save the skin for dog treats).<br><br>When the broth is finished, fish out the veggies and grab a baster. Suck out one cup of the broth from the bottom of the pot. This stuff will be murky and full of "stuff." That's good. Blend the broth with the soup and Rotel mixture, then add the jalapeño to taste (start small and work your way up).<br><br>Pop another beer. Ladle enough of the broth/mixture into a square glass dish (8"-9") to coat the bottom. Lay down tortilla quarters to form a bottom "crust." Scatter half the shredded chicken over the tortillas, then scatter half the chopped onion. Shred lots of cheddar to cover. Lots. Ladle in half the broth mixture ~ it's gloppy, so just rain it around, it'll settle in.<br><br>Repeat the tortilla, chicken and onion layering. But for this top layer, glop the remaining broth/mixture, then top with shredded cheddar. Lots of cheddar. Lots.<br><br><br>Bake for 50-60 minutes at 350. It's ready when it's doing a good simmer and the cheddar (lots of cheddar) starts to turn a golden brown. Let it set for at least ten minutes.<br><br><br>Prep Time ~ To serve by 7, I start around 3, which works because that's a great time to pop a beer.<br><br>You can double this recipe if you want to double your work. But the recipe above will feed 4-6 people. It's dense and rich and truly killer delicious.<br><br>I freeze up the left over broth, it's great for simmering green beans and such.<br><br>DO NOT substitute flour tortillas. You'll wind up with a really gross, swollen "I Love Lucy" looking mess. A friend that I don't want to embarrass can testify. <br><br><br><br> <br> <br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/22/07 07:38 AM

<h3>[color:blue]AMERICA'S TEST KITCHEN</font color=blue></h3><br>The Quest For the Perfect MITT<br><center>or<br><h1>[color:red]TOO HOT TO HANDLE</font color=red>!</h1></center><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/22/07 09:42 AM

America's Test Kitchen<br><br>Matching Pasta Shapes w/Sauces<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: DLC

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 09/22/07 12:27 PM

Oh man Spark.... thanks for this recipe... my wife LOVES scallops... now I can surprise her with something new ...<br><br>man that sounds great.... MMM..MM.. MM..MMM.. MMMM..... <br><br>David (OFI)
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/01/07 04:52 PM

Lasagna rolls. Oh so good!<br><br>Got this recipe from the Food Channel. more info to come as soon as my wife writes the directions down.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/01/07 06:28 PM

Thanks, John. I just gained five pounds. <br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/01/07 07:07 PM

Hope you had a nice red wine to go with that fabulous dish.<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:16 PM

It was REALLY good. <br><br>My sister in law has a fat-free recipe if you want to try it. Ours was much easier to make and it had prosciutto. <br><br><br><br>Lasagna Roll-Ups (4 Servings)<br><br>8 lasagna noodles<br>1 cup shredded nonfat or reduced fat mozzarella cheese<br><br>Filling:<br><br>15 ounces nonfat ricotta cheese<br>1 package (10 ounces) frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry<br>1/2 cup grated carrot<br>2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley<br><br>Sauce:<br><br>1 can (1 pound) unsalted tomatoes, crushed (I use the salted so Tom will not add his own - his portion may be more dangerous)<br>1 can (6 ounces) unsalted tomato paste ( I use the italian flavored paste)<br>1/4 cup unsalted vegetable broth or water<br>1 medium yellow onion, chopped<br>1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning<br>1 teaspoon crushed fresh garlic<br><br>Time Saving Tip - If you are in a hurry, use 3 cups of bottled fat-free marinara sauce or spaghetti sauce for the sauce! Shhh, don't tell you big cheat!<br><br><br>Directions:<br>1. To make the sauce, combine all the sauce ingredients in a pot, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. <br><br>2. To make the filling, combine all of the filling ingredients in a medium-sized bowl, and stir to mix well. Set aside.<br><br>3. Cook the noodles al dente according to package directions. Drain, rinse, and drain again.<br><br>4. Coat a 2 and 1/2-quart casserole dish with nonstick cooking spray. To assemble the roll-ups, arrange the noodles on a flat surface (I place the cooked noodles on wax paper to avoid sticking) and spread 1/8 of the filling mixture along the length of each noodle. Roll each noodle up jelly-roll style, and place in the prepared dish, seam side down. Pour the sauce over the roll-ups.<br><br>5. Cover the dish with aluminum foil, and bake @ 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove the foil, top with mozzarella cheese, and bake for 10 additional minutes, or until cheese is melted. Serve hot. <br><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:17 PM

Next time we will. We didn't have any on hand.<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:19 PM

How about some chili recipes??<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:24 PM

OK, here is our recipe:<br><br>Lasagna Rolls<br><br><br>Sauce: <br>2 tablespoons unsalted butter <br>4 teaspoons all-purpose flour <br>1 1/4 cups whole milk <br>1/4 teaspoon salt <br>1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper <br>Pinch ground nutmeg<br><br>Lasagna: <br>1 (15-ounce) container whole milk ricotta cheese <br>1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed, squeezed dry <br>1 cup plus 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan <br>3 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, chopped <br>1 large egg, beaten to blend <br>3/4 teaspoon salt, plus more for salting water <br>1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper <br>1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil <br>12 uncooked lasagna noodles <br>2 cups marinara sauce <br>1 cup shredded mozzarella (about 4 ounces)<br><br>To make the sauce: Melt the butter in a heavy medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the flour and whisk for 3 minutes. Whisk in the milk. Increase the heat to medium-high. Whisk the sauce until it comes to a simmer and is thick and smooth, about 3 minutes. Whisk the salt, pepper, and nutmeg into the bechamel sauce.<br>Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.<br>Whisk the ricotta, spinach, 1 cup Parmesan, prosciutto, egg, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl to blend.<br>Add a tablespoon or 2 of oil to a large pot of boiling salted water. Boil the noodles until just tender but still firm to bite. Drain. Arrange the noodles in a single layer on a baking sheet to prevent them from sticking.<br>Butter a 13-by-9-by-2-inch glass baking dish. Pour the bechamel sauce over the bottom of the prepared dish. Lay out 4 lasagna noodles on a work surface, then spread about 3 tablespoons of ricotta mixture evenly over each noodle. Starting at 1 end, roll each noodle like a jelly roll. Lay the lasagna rolls seam side down, without touching, atop the bechamelsauce in the dish. Repeat with the remaining noodles and ricotta mixture. Spoon 1 cup of marinara sauce over the lasagna rolls. Sprinkle the mozzarella and remaining 2 tablespoons of Parmesan over the lasagna rolls. Cover tightly with foil. Bake until heated through and the sauce bubbles, about 20 minutes. Uncover and bake until the cheese on top becomes golden, about 15 minutes longer. Let stand for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the remaining marinara sauce in a heavy small saucepan over medium heat until hot, and serve alongside.<br><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:45 PM

WOW! I'm Psyched!<br> That second recipe sounds like just the ticket!<br><br>This this lil' EYE-talian doan like tomato sauce.<br>my favorite pizza is a "white pizza" made with <br>ricotta, fresh mozzarella & Parmesan cheese.<br><br>Just enough marinara sauce to 'pinken' it and<br>the prosciutto sounds like the perfect touch to<br>bring it on home. <br><br>Thank the Misses... <br>that recipe is very well laid out & easy to follow.<br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 02:48 PM

Trust me...it's VERY good. <br><br>I bet if we added in some garlic it would be even better. My mouth is drooling just thinking about it.<br><br>I'll get the directions for Amy's chicken enchiladas. Those are really good too.<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 03:10 PM

<br>Amy's chicken enchiladas. Oh YES PLEASE!!! <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 03:22 PM

<br>Serve it along with Crusty Italian Garlic Bread on the side.<br>That goes very well with both types of sauce, and the wine<br>That way people not wanting Garlic breath can pass on it <br>if they have to go to a meeting or whatever.<br><br>Preheat the oven to 350F<br>Split a loaf of crusty Italian bread lengthwise.<br>Spread generously with a mixture of butte, garlic powder,<br>Parmason cheese & a pinch of dried parsley.<br><br>Bake on a foil lined cookie sheet until it stinks up the kitchen<br>(...and the bread is golden brown around the edges)<br><br>Cut into slices and serve warm.<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 04:31 PM

I'm making this one with the bechamel sauce. Maybe this weekend. Yeah, I might throw in a little garlic or maybe some buttery garlic bread will do as the side.<br><br>I had soccer practice right up to the baseball game so all I got tonight was a ham sandwich. Reading the recipe is driving me crazy.<br><br>thanks.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 04:53 PM

What's bechamal sauce? <br><br>Let me know what you think. <br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 05:04 PM

Bechamel is flour, milk, butter sauce.<br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 05:33 PM

heh...I just noticed it in the recipe that I posted. Ooops. Amy fixed it, not me!<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 05:56 PM

It's a basic "white sauce" that is the base for many other sauces<br>which may also include mustard, cheese, onions, or meat stock.<br><br>sparkie's shepherds or cottage pies begin with the same white sauce,<br>...so does my "Saw Mill Sausage Gravy"<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 07:55 PM

What is butter sauce?<br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 08:19 PM

The sauce is made from butter, milk, and flour. English . . . she's such a hard language <br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 08:21 PM

They're all saying the same thing, just a little differently.<br><br>Equal parts butter and flour.<br><br>Melt butter, get it bubbly then blend in flour. Sitr in milk a little at a time, usually about a cup till the sauce thickens. Think of it as Yankee roux.<br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/07 08:46 PM

Ahhh, thank you. Being Canadian I don't know from white sauce.<br><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/11/07 02:42 PM

Ok OP. You are letting this slide down too far!<br><br>Here are 2 more recipe's that I got from my mother in law. We will try the 1st one soon!<br><br>Italian Sausage and Spinach Pasta<br>1 10-ounce package penne pasta<br>1 package hot italian sausage, casings removed, cooked and crumbled<br>1 medium onion, chopped<br>3 large cloves garlic, pressed<br>1 28-ounce can petite diced tomatoes<br>1 container prepared pesto<br>salt and pepper to taste<br>1 cup grated Parmesan cheese-plus additional for topping<br>8 cups baby spinach leaves<br>6-8 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese-plus additional for topping<br> <br>Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and set aside.<br>In a stock pot cook the sausage, onion and garlic until the sausage is no longer pink.<br>Add the tomatoes and simmer until thick-about 10 minutes.<br>Stir in the pesto, salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer.<br>In a LARGE bowl mix the pasta, parmesan, spinach and mozzarella. Pour the hot tomato sauce over the pasta and stir. (This will wilt the spinach and melt the cheese) Pour into a 9x13 casserole. Let cool for a few minutes. Top with extra parmesan and mozzarella. Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.<br> <br><br><br>Krispy Kreme Bread Pudding<br>2 dozen Krispy Kreme doughnuts<br>1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk (not evaporated)<br>2 4.5-ounce cans fruit cocktail, undrained<br>2 eggs, beaten<br>1 9-ounce box raisins (I used golden raisins and not the whole box)<br>1 pinch salt<br>1-2 teaspoons cinnamon<br>Butter Rum sauce<br> <br>Cube doughnuts into a large bowl. Pour other ingredients on top of the doughnuts and let soak for a few minutes. Mix all together until doughnuts have soaked up the liquid as much as possible.<br> <br>Bake for about one hour at 350 degrees until center has jelled. Top with Butter Rum Sauce.<br> <br>Butter Rum Sauce:<br>1 stick butter<br>1 pound box confectioners' sugar<br>Rum, to taste<br> <br>Melt butter and slowly stir in cofectioners's sugar. Add rum and heat until bubbly. Pour over each serving of Krispy Kreme bread pudding. YUM!!!!!!!!!!<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/11/07 03:10 PM

<br>I'm going to make 2 pans of that BreadPudding. One for each hip! <br>(so I don't get lobesided & walk in circles)<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/22/07 05:19 PM

Banana-Chocolate Chip Muffins<br><br> <br><br>1/4 cup sour cream 1 1/2 cups flour<br><br>1 teaspoon baking soda pinch of salt<br><br>1/2 cup butter, softened 1 cup mashed bananas<br><br>3/4 cup sugar 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips<br><br>1 egg 1 teaspoon vanilla<br><br> <br><br>Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Stir sour cream and soda together. Set aside. Cream butter with sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg, beating well. Beat in sour cream mixture. Stir in remaining ingredients. Don't over-mix. Spoon into greased muffin pans and bake for about 18 minutes. Let cool before removing from pan.<br><br>
Posted by: lanovami

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/22/07 05:27 PM

My mother's Pot Pies:<br><br>(remember, the taste is in the details)<br><br>Open box<br>Dump pot pie upside down into bowl, throwing away aluminum tray (or keeping for later use, whatever that may be)<br>Microwave on high for 4 minutes.<br><br>Vo&#237;la. And this is why I never complain about airline food.<br><br>We are what we repeatedly do. -Aristotle
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 12:27 AM

Wheat-Free Heart-Stopper Flan:<br><br>Pastry:<br>200g spelt flour<br>100g butter<br>teaspoon of salt<br>dash of water<br><br>Filling:<br>3 eggs<br>3 large onions<br>a dozen mushrooms<br>200g grated gruyere cheese<br>1/2 cup pine nuts<br>tarragon<br>teaspoon of salt<br>ground black pepper<br>olive oil<br>splash of milk (cow/soya/whatever)<br><br>Pastry - rub butter into flour/salt to crumble consistency, then add just enough water to make the pastry bind - it really is very little, the less water, the less leathery the pastry is. This makes enough pastry for 2 flans, so you can whack half of it in the freezer for later use if you think you'll still be alive after eating the first flan. Roll out half the pastry and line a flan case - prick the pastry and blind bake the case while you're cooking the filling (around 15 minutes in a preheated oven at 325 F/160 C/gas mark 3 should do it, make sure it's cooked but don't let it get too dark!)<br><br>Filling - peel and halve the onions, then slice them really fine so you have half-onion-rings, and fry them slowly in a good dose of olive oil until they're transparent and tender and a bit brown. Slice the mushrooms finely and add them in, along with the salt, pepper, and tarragon, and cook until the mushrooms give out their juices...<br><br>Spoon the filling into the baked flan case (don't press it down smooth!), cover it with the grated cheese. Now beat the eggs in a bowl with the splash of milk, and pour them over the filling/cheese so it soaks through. Sprinkle the pine nuts on top, pop the whole thing back in the oven for another 20 minutes.<br><br>If you really want to go for broke, when you beat the eggs/milk, add some cream... you really, really need a salad with this flan, because then your guests can all persuade themselves that it's a healthy meal.<br><br>- padmavyuha<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 12:41 AM

Oh, and what the hell, a dessert:<br><br>Marron Glacé:<br><br>chestnut purée<br>honey<br>double cream<br>dark chocolate<br><br>It's been too long since I made this, so play with the quantities, I'm going to have to... basically, buy tins of chestnut purée (which is usually sweetened), or cook and mash some chestnuts and add honey (much tastier than the canned stuff, but hey, who can be bothered?) - mix the purée and the cream to make a fairly stiff paste, put it in some kind of square dish like an ice cream carton or something and put it in the fridge, where it'll set. Pop it out onto a plate once it has set. Melt the chocolate and pour it over the slab, let it cool and then pop it into the fridge again so the chocolate goes good and crispy.<br><br>And yes, you can serve this with cream on it, because by now, what difference will it make? My mum used to make this for me on my birthday. What a treat!<br><br>- padmavyuha<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: lanovami

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 12:57 AM

"My mum used to make this for me on my birthday. What a treat!"<br><br>You said that last part just to rub it in didn't you? <br><br>We are what we repeatedly do. -Aristotle
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 03:08 AM

1/2 cup gloat<br>1/2 cup nostalgia<br>add sugar or salt to taste...<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 05:58 AM

"My mother's Pot Pies... "<br><br>Hmm... if I didn't know better, I'd say your mother is a bachelor! <br><br>... 'cause that's MY favourite pot pie recipe. <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 10:23 AM

<br>CUTE! <br><br><br>OKOK, I can perhaps get the chestnut paste (maybe)<br>but what's "double cream" ? is that what we call<br>"heavy cream"? unwhipped "whipping cream" ?<br><br>The honey is a cinch, I've been stocking up<br>since learning that the bees were going<br>...um... "out of beesniss"... <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: lanovami

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/23/07 01:15 PM

Don't get me wrong, my mother loved us. She was a great mom, in her way. She just wasn't anything that could be described as "domestic".<br><br>We are what we repeatedly do. -Aristotle
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 12:50 PM

<B>Carrot & Tangerine Soup</B><br>Recipe by chef Mitch Prensky of Supper Restaurant<br><br>• 2 lbs. diced carrots<br>• 9 oz. water<br>• 9 oz. fresh tangerine juice<br>• ¼ tsp. tangerine zest<br>• 1 sprig of thyme<br>• 4 oz. sliced shallots<br>• salt and pepper, to taste<br>• 9 oz. fresh carrot juice<br>• 9 oz. water<br><br>Directions: Melt Butter. Sweat shallots for five minutes on medium heat. Add diced carrots, lower heat, cover and cook until tender. 10 minutes with no caramelization.<br><br>Add water, tangerine juice, tangerine zest and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes. Puree soup mixture in a high speed blender until smooth.<br><br>Before serving, thin soup with fresh carrot juice and water until reaching desired soup consistency.<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 12:53 PM

Have you tried this?<br><br>Definately sounds different....<br><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 01:05 PM

I've had carrot soup which was made sweet and savory with brown sugar and onions, but I haven't tried the Carrot & Tangerine version. Sounds pretty tasty to me!<br><br>Bonus Kitchen Tip for the day:<br><br>Everyone likes good tools, whether they're a home builder or a chef. <a href="http://us.microplane.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=2" style="color: teal; text-decoration: underline;">Microplane</a> offers a brilliant line of graters for the kitchen. They're well made and as sharp as anything you've ever used. From filing off fresh nutmeg, to thin slicing potatoes to shaving off rock-hard cheese, these are the best you can get, as far as I know.<br><br>Oh, and they make woodworking tools, too!<br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 01:34 PM

You're being polite, John. <br><br>Sorry, Phos, but you could probably chase me outta the county with carrot soup. And I do like carrots, but . . . nope. <br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: iRock

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 01:45 PM

Can't remember if I posted this.<br><br>Couch Potato Soup<br>I made this up myself and it was also in the paper I work for in a series on employee recipes. It couldn't be easier as the frozen hash browns save the peeling and boiling potato parts. Thus the Couch Potato moniker. You can use fresh onions in place of the dried. You can also add corn or clams to vary the recipe. <br>Couch Potato Soup<br>1 or 2 Cans Aunt Penny's <br>White Sauce (Depending on how much soup you want)<br>Milk <br>(at least a quart)<br>Diced Ham <br>(Bacon can be added also)<br>1 or 2 stalks Celery<br>Frozen Southern Style <br>Hash Browns<br><br>Celery Salt<br>Onion Flakes<br>White Table Salt<br>Black Pepper <br>(Fresh Ground if <br>stronger flavor desired)<br>Butter<br>Parsley<br><br>Whisk white sauce together with milk until smooth. Use enough milk for a fairly thin sauce. Heat in a large saucepan on stove. Add the following ingredients to taste.<br>Onion flakes, celery salt, salt, pepper, diced ham (and/or bacon), chopped celery, butter and parsley. Heat to slow boil. Make sure you stir often enough to keep from scorching on the bottom. When boiling add enough frozen hash browns to leave as much broth as desired. Remember this will thicken as potatoes soften. Cook until potatoes taste done & celery is tender, at least 20 minutes. Can add additional milk if too thick or for reheating after refrigeration.<br><br><br>oh yeah, that's going in the blog
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 02:17 PM

Well...I didn't want to be impolite especially since I haven't tried this before.<br><br>The tangerine sauce is what throws me off.<br><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 02:34 PM

Meh, no worries, Lea and John. Different munches for different bunches.<br><br>There are very few things I won't eat, and my taste buds can easily imagine what the combination of flavors in Carrot & Tangerine Soup would taste like. Think: Mind's Eye. But substitute tongue.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/10/07 04:35 PM

When you put it that way ~ it almost sounds sexy. <br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/27/07 11:27 AM

Now that everyone's slept off THANKSGIVING DINNER<br><br>Does anyone care to venture a SPECIAL HOLIDAY Recipe or Two?<br><br>Check this out: <br>Being a Southern Girl, I prefer Sweet'Tater Pie to the traditional Pumpkin Pie<br>...but they're so similar that one could use the same recipe if you had a mind to:<br><br><br>SWEET POTATO CHIFFON PIE<br><br>1 small box vanilla wafers<br>1/2 cup sugar<br>1/2 cup finely chopped pecans<br>1 stick butter, melted<br><br>1 1/2 cups egg nog<br>2 cups mashed sweet potatoes<br>3/4 cup light brown sugar<br>3 egg yolks<br>1/2 teaspoon cinnamon<br>Pinch nutmeg<br>Pinch salt<br>Pinch ginger<br>1 envelope unflavored gelatin<br>1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract<br>3 egg whites<br><br>2 cups sweetened whipped cream<br>Confectioners' sugar<br><br>Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.<br><br>In a food processor, combine the vanilla wafers, 1/4 cup sugar, and pecan<br> pieces. Mix until the crust is smooth and resembles a coarse texture. With the <br>machine running, add the butter and process until all of the butter is <br>incorporated. Remove the crust from the processor and press into a deep-dish <br>10-inch pie pan. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 10 to 12 minutes or <br>until the crust is set.<br><br>In a saucepan, combine the eggnog, sweet potatoes, brown sugar, egg yolks, <br>cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, and ginger together. Mix well. Place the pan over <br>medium heat and cook the mixture for 10 minutes, stirring constantly.<br>Remove the pan from the heat and sprinkle the gelatin over the filling. Whisk <br>the gelatin into the filling until the gelatin dissolves. Stir in the vanilla. Cover the <br>filling and refrigerate until cool.<br><br>Using an electric mixer, whip the egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add <br>1/4 cup sugar and continue to beat until the peaks are stiff. Fold the egg <br>whites into the sweet potato filling. Spread the filling evenly over the crust and <br>refrigerate the pie for about 1 hour.<br><br>Spread the whipped cream, evenly over the top of the pie.<br>Slice the pie into 8 pieces. Place a piece of the pie on each serving plate. <br><br><br>http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_13252,00.html<br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 06:05 AM

Winter is approaching. No soups listed yet?<br><br>Give me your alls best veggie soup directions! <br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 06:54 AM

Sure!<br><br>Campbell's Bean with Bacon from a can - use 2 parts water to 1 part milk, a hefty dash of fresh ground black pepper and a few drops of your favourite hot sauce - serve sprinkled with a liberal amount of freshly made croutons and Bob's your uncle!<br><br>Doctoring "fast" foods can be fun!<br><br>- alec -
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:00 AM

ok wiseguy I could do that myself easily enough.<br><br>I'm talking fresh vegetables and spices.<br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:15 AM

Fresh vegetables? That stuff'll kill ya!!! <br><br>Besides, my recipes are drawn from YEARS of experience as a bachelor. <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:33 AM

I had years of experience too...campbells soups were a mainstay. <br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:37 AM

Please, just tell me y'all don't eat soup for breakfast.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:40 AM

Do I look Hawaiian to you? <br><br>
Posted by: Topper

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 07:54 AM

[color:blue]"Fresh vegetables? That stuff'll kill ya!!!"</font color=blue><br><br>Amen to that. All I want is a big red bloody steak with lots of butter.<br><br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 08:02 AM

"All I want is a big red bloody steak with lots of butter."<br><br>Dang! Now you have my mouth watering!!! And I have to drop of a couple of iPod touches to my favourite steak house this afternoon. I think resistance will be futile!<br><br>- alec -
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 08:04 AM

oh, I love a good steak!<br><br>Butter eh...never have put that on my steak.<br><br>
Posted by: Topper

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/13/07 09:49 AM

As long as you are there <br><br>
Posted by: JonnyCat

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/15/07 09:48 AM

Here's my secret recipe for Bailey's Irish Cream - spread some Christmas cheer!<br><br>5 eggs<br>1 can of condensed milk<br>1 tsp. coconut extract<br>2 tbsp. Hershey's chocolate syrup<br>1/2 tsp. vanilla extract<br>13 oz. Irish Whisky<br><br>Blend very well, chill. Serves 1 or more depending on how thirsty you are :)<br><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/15/07 10:29 AM

Soooo, yesterday I'm up the street at the B.J.'s Wholesale outlet to get some eggs and some apples. I was out of hot sauce, too, but didn't have enough money with me to get it. Besides, I never even thought to check to see what they have there in the way of hot sauce.<br><br>So I cruised the aisle looking for it. I spy big jugs (somewhere near a gallon, I think) of Frank's Hot Sauce®™. Not bad for every day use, and pretty similar to the Crystal®™ I usually get at the regular grocery store. The posted unit pricing was $1.13 per quart. On the shelf above was Tabasco®™...<B><I><U>$13.30</B></I></U> per quart!!! Over 10x the price of Frank's!?!?!<br><br>You gotta be kidding me!<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/15/07 11:28 AM

2 new ones that I plan on trying this week:<br><br>Chuck Roast with Zest<br>Ingredients<br>3-4 lbs boneless beef chuck roast<br>2 tsp Sweet Hungarian paprika<br>Salt and pepper<br>2 Tbs olive or canola oil<br>1/2 C beef broth<br>1/2 C heavy red wine<br>3 Tbs balsamic vinegar<br>1 Tbs honey or brown sugar<br>1-8 oz can tomato sauce<br>1 large onion, quartered and sliced<br>3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced<br>1 Tbs Worcestershire sauce<br>2 med. carrots, sliced<br>Combine broth, wine, tomato sauce, vinegar, honey and Worcestershire sauce; set aside. Place sliced onions, carrots and garlic in the bottom of a 5-7 qt. slow cooker.<br>Blend salt, pepper and paprika. Rub into roast. Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Brown roast in skillet for approx. 5 min. per side.<br>Place roast on the vegtables in slow cooker. Pour wine and broth mixture into the skillet and scrape up any browned bits; pour this over the roast.<br>Cover and cook on low for 8-9 hours.<br>Serves 8<br><br><br>--------------------<br><br>Beef Stew Bourguignonne <br><br>Ingredients<br>2 lbs beef stew meat, cut into 1-in cubes<br>2 Tbs oil<br>1 can (10 3/4 oz) condensed mushroom soup<br>1 med onion, chopped<br>3 cloves garlic, pressed or chopped<br>1/4 tsp dried oregano<br>1/4 tsp black pepper<br>3 carrots, peeled and chopped into bite size pieces<br>6-8 med. size mushrooms, cut in half<br>1 Tbs (more or less depending on your taste) Worcestershire sauce<br>1/3 C dry red wine<br>1/4 C flour<br>Brown meat, in hot oil in skillet, add onion and garlic and cook until they are translucent. stir in oregano and pepper. Transfer meat mixture to crock pot, add carrots and mushroom, Worcestershire sauce and soup. Stir until mixed. Cover and cook on low for 12 hours (adjust cooking time to your slow cooker).<br>Turn cooker to high heat setting. Mix flour in 1/2 C cold water (slowly so you don't get lumps) and stir into beef mixture. Cook and stir until sauce is thickened and bubbly.<br>Serve over hot cooked noodles, or rice, or potatoes.<br>Serves 6<br><br><br>
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/15/07 11:56 AM

I don't see the Zest in your recipe, but would prefer my foods without soap. <br><br>- alec -
Posted by: GingerBreadMan

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/15/07 05:01 PM

GingerBread Men and Women<br>------------------------<br><br>3 1/14 cups flour<br>1/2 teaspoon baking soda<br>1/4 teaspoon salt<br>1 teaspoon ground cinnamon<br>2 teaspoons ground ginger<br>1/4 teaspoon ground cloves<br>1 cup salted butter (softened)<br>3/4 cup dark brown sugar<br>1 large egg<br>1/2 molasses<br><br>1) Combine flour, soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves in a bowl<br><br>2) In a large bowl cream butter and sugar together with electric mixer. Add egg and molasses and beat at medium until smooth. Blend flour mixture (step 1) at low speed - do not overmix.<br><br>3) Roll out dough to 1/4'' thickness. Cut out men and women. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes<br><br>Icing<br>------<br><br>2/3 cup confectioners sugar<br>1 to 2 teaspoon milk<br><br>Decorate to taste with icing. Makes two dozen 6 inch men and women.<br><br><br>I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left.
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 02:48 PM

Cooking this right now.<br><br>Beer-braised brisket with mustard sauce<br><br>Prep & cooking time 3-1/2 to 4 hours<br><br>2 1/2 to 3 1/2 lbs boneless beef brisket<br>1 Tbsp olive oil<br>2 large onions, chopped<br>1 bottle of beer<br>1/2 cup Dijon-style mustard<br>2 Tbsp chopped parsley<br><br>1. heat oil in stockpot over medium heat until hot; brown beef brisket. Remove; sprinkle with 1 tsp salt & 1/2 tsp pepper<br>2. Add onions to pot; cook and stir 3 to 5 minutes or until tender<br>Place brisket, fat side up, in pot. Add beer; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly and simmer 2 1/2 to 3 hrs or until brisket is fork-tender.<br>3. Remove brisket. Skim fat from liquid; cook uncovered, 15 to 20 minutes or until reduced by half.<br>4. Combine mustard, parsley, and 2 Tbsp onion sauce. Carve brisket diagonally across the grain; top with onion sauce. Serve with mustard sauce.<br><br>Here's the brisket cooking in beer with onions.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 03:12 PM

WOW! That looks absolutely delicious. Enjoy.<br><br>I'm having left-over pizza, with a beer. <br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 03:20 PM

It's killing me smelling it cook! Can't wait to eat it.<br><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 03:31 PM

I bet. We all wish we were there to enjoy with you!<br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 03:56 PM

Before I got married, I was the type that ate out a lot or cooked the simple things like campbell soups, etc.<br><br>But now I love cooking and learning how to cook. My wife is working right now, so it's nice to be able to cook something and have her come home to it. Also, it's kinda celebration dinner for getting A's in school. I finally got my other class grade, so it's official.<br><br>
Posted by: G4Dualie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 04:00 PM

Congratulations for getting all A's, now pass me a plate of that food, dammit!<br><br><br>M i c h a e l (OFI)
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 04:01 PM

It's not finished Michael! Timer says about another 30 minutes then I take it out and do something else...(have to look at the directions)<br><br>
Posted by: Leslie

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 05:02 PM

It's well over 30 minutes--please pass the plate. <br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 05:53 PM

*burp* <br><br>sorry, we put the leftovers up already! mmmmmmmmmm man that was good! I cheated with mashed potatoes...ended up getting the type that you heat up and serve.<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/17/07 08:03 PM

OK, so here is my top-secret Buffalo wings recipe:<br><br>Benevides' Baked Buffalo Wings<br><br>We try to stay away from fried foods, but we LOVE Buffalo Wings; so we came up with the following recipe, which is one of our favorites. We frequently make this on the weekends and munch in front of the TV while watching a DVD or sports (in high definition). Enjoy!<br><br>About 3 lbs. chicken wings, split with wing tips removed<br>Ken's Chunky Blue Cheese Dressing, regular or Lite - Rick uses regular and I use Lite)<br><br>The Magic Concoction:<br>1 tablespoon sesame oil<br>1/4 cup Frank's Red Hot Sauce<br>5 dashes tabasco sauce<br>1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce<br>1 tablespoon Heinz Ketchup<br>1/4 teaspoon garlic powder<br><br>Heat oven to 425°F. Mix the concoction in a small bowl, stir well with a whisk. Brush the concoction onto the bottom of both a 13x9x2" and an 11x7x1.5" Pyrex baking dish. Place chicken skin side down in pans (very important). Brush chicken with the rest of the concoction. Place in preheated oven for one hour. Turn chicken carefully, using tongs, and place back in the oven. Cook for no longer than one more hour until desired crispness is obtained. It's important to keep a close watch on the wings during the last hour of cooking so that they don't become too dry. <br><br>Serve on a plate with fresh celery sticks and two small containers for dipping; one container of Frank's Red Hot Sauce and one of Ken's Chunky Blue Cheese Dressing. Watch the Patriots win.<br><br><br><br>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/24/07 03:10 PM

Found this today. I like it!<br><br>http://www.videojug.com/<br><br>Actual videos of how to cook stuff and other things.<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/24/07 03:40 PM

WOW! Thanx for that!<br><br>Ted LOVES Buffalo Chicken<br>and he won't be able to eat <br>fried foods anymore.<br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/24/07 03:55 PM

<center><br><h1>Snowman Cake</h1><br><br><br><br></center><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/25/07 07:06 AM

You're welcome. Hope you enjoy it. After I got used to having them baked, I ordered the fried wings in a restaurant and couldn't even eat them. They were too greasy, lol.<br><br><br><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/25/07 08:11 AM

I experienced the same phenomenon when I went on a low fat diet prior <br>to my Gall Bladder operation years ago. <br><br>Following the operation, when I wanted to try a few of my old favorites<br>I couldn't even stand Potato Chips for all the greasy taste that I had never <br>even noticed before that.<br><br>Recalling that experience has really peeked my interest... this healthy<br>diet may not be so bad after all. It'll take a few techniques adjustments.<br><br>I'm sure we'll both be the better for it in the end.<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/09/08 09:35 PM

<A HREF=http://www.neatorama.com/2008/01/09/edible-googly-eyes/>[color:TEAL]<U>Eat your deity!</U></FONT></A><br><br><IMG SRC=http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2092/2180954633_a0bc094177_o.jpg><br><br>
Posted by: lesh

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/09/08 09:41 PM

Heh! I think I'll have to add some 'googly eye' cookies to my repertoire.<br><br>
Posted by: choker

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 10:45 AM

Keep this going, I'm loving these recipes<br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 11:44 AM

OK, I remember I forgot to post a full recipe for German potato salad. I married into German Apple Farmers from Virginia so I will add the changes we make to the standard GPS at the end.<br><br>INGREDIENTS<br> 4 potatoes<br> 4 slices bacon<br> 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour<br> 2 tablespoons white sugar<br> 1/3 cup water<br> 1/4 cup white wine vinegar<br> 1/2 cup chopped green onions<br> salt and pepper to taste<br> <br> DIRECTIONS<br> 1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add potatoes; cook until tender but still firm, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool and chop.<br> 2. Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium high heat until evenly brown. Drain, crumble and set aside. Reserve bacon fat.<br> 3. Add the flour, sugar, water and vinegar to skillet and cook in reserved bacon fat over medium heat until dressing is thick.<br> 4. Add bacon, potatoes and green onions to skillet and stir until coated. Cook until heated and season with salt and pepper. Serve warm.<br><br>Tricks: We always have home made sweet pickles in the house and about a half cup of those pickles all diced up is a great addition.<br>The other killer trick is thick sliced bacon overcooked so it goes all crumbly. You should not be able to bend. The absolutue best bacon we get from smokehouse.com It is the Pepper coated City Bacon. Even better (but some might not be able to handle country) is the thick sliced country bacon. Is it weird to by bacon on the internet? Totally loopy but I did it once and have never bought bacon from anywhere else again. There hams are great too. (Make sure you have a southerner in your house if you go attic ham. A Yankee will sqeal "too salty" but I learned to love it with eggs in the morning and red eye gravy.) The prices seem expensive but the taste per dollar makes it a bargain. We get an attic ham packed in slices and it might last a year with a slice or two every few saturday mornings.<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 01:34 PM

OKEY DOKEY!<br><br>Any One Else Into GINGERBREAD HOUSES?<br><br>While it may seem a bit passed THE Season, but you must understand that it takes a good deal<br>of time to gather the fixtures and various decorations, such as Wilton Piping Tips & Disposable <br>Piping Bags and a board to build it on. Then you need to create a pattern, and cut it out, by<br>that time you'll prolly be into next fall, and ready to haunt the shops for the candy decorations.<br><br>What's distinctly different about the recipe I use, is that it's not the soft cakey type, but rather<br>a tasty yet very rigid material, almost like plywood, that you can roll out very thin, and glue<br>together using Royal Icing into a very sturdy structure that can support lots of candy and/or<br>structural details, such as window-boxes, shutters, multiple tiers & roofs, yet still be be<br>busted up and munched with tea or hot coco as the winter progresses. In fact a few times, I filled<br>the outter structure with candy, and busted it open like a Pinida at the Annual Christmas Party.<br>Another year I constructed a BirdHouse around a nest made of chocolate coated pretzels, formed <br>by arranging the pretzels in a bowl & heating it for about 20 seconds in the microwave oven<br>to melt the chocolate, then allowed to cool & removed from the bowl. The house was constructed<br>around the nest, and it was filled to overflowing with Milk and Dark DOVE chocolate eggs.<br><br>The Royal Icing Recipe also has extraordinary tensile strength that sets quickly, and doubles as<br>both the "Glue" to hold it together, and as one of the main decorations in it's own right, since it's<br>initially SNOW White... but can be tinted or colored any shade or hue, which TAD-A-DA lends<br>it self to Fun Structures of EASTER, or Garden Parties, Or Bridal & Baby Showers, which<br>brings up the "SUGAR ARTS" although that may be reserved for the TRULY INSANE! (like me.)<br><br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 01:39 PM

<h2>GINGERBREAD RECIPE</h2><br>YEILD: Approx. 6 1/2 Cups of Dough<br>(Enough to Make 1 Small Simple House)<br><br>1 c. all-vegetable shortening (Crisco)<br>1 c. sugar<br>1 tsp. baking powder<br>1 tsp, salt<br>1 c. unsulphered molasses (light or dark,<br> the only difference will be the shade <br> of brown of the resulting gingerbread.)<br>1 tsp. ground ginger<br>1 tsp. cinnamon<br>5 c. flour<br>4 Tbs. water<br><br>MIX: the first 7 ingredients in your mixer until smooth, then add water, then add <br>in the flour a cup at a time, until it becomes too stiff for the mixer, and finish adding <br>the flour, kneading by hand.<br><br>* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *<br><br>ROLL OUT: the dough to 1/4” for decorative parts (doors etc.) 3/8” for supporting <br>walls and roofs.<br><br>TIP: The less you move the dough, the more they will retain their shape.<br>I roll them out on Parchment Paper and then cut out the shapes, and lift the entire <br>thing right onto the cookie sheet.<br>You can even roll them out right on the cookie sheet (front or back) cut the shapes, <br>and put them right into the oven.<br><br>TIP: I use a yard-stick from a paint-store, that is between 1/4”-3/8” thick, and <br>sawed it in half.<br>I set them to the width of my rolling pin and just roll out the dough to that thickness.<br><br>CUT: place the paper pattern unto rolled out dough. Work from the center-outward, <br>cutting out the windows before the outer edges to cut down on distortion!<br>TIP: Using a good sharp knife will result in clean sides, and good corner angles.<br><br><br>BAKE: 350o F. for 10-15 min.**<br>depending on size thickness, true oven temperature, type of cookie sheet. <br><br>**tiny pieces, for shutters & doors may take 5 min. larger pieces 20 min.<br>I strongly suggest baking them separately.<br>Watch it, and remove pieces as they become browned at the edges.<br><br>Hot gingerbread it always soft, you have to wait until it cools to test for hardness.<br>It can be set back in the oven for additional cooking if necessary.<br><br>_________________________________________________________________<br><h2>ROYAL ICING RECIPE</h2><br>2 pounds confectioner’s 10X powdered sugar<br>4 Tbs. meringue powder *<br>10-12 Tbs. warm water<br><br>In a spotlessly grease-free mixing bowl, <br>MIX: Sugar and meringue powder. Add water.<br>BEAT: Until the icing forms stiff peaks. <br>(6-8 min. w/heavy duty mixer. 10-12 min. w/hand held mixer)<br><br>Keep the icing bowl covered with a damp towel while it is being used, and keep <br>it in an airtight container when it isn’t.<br>(There is no need to refrigerate it) you can rebeat it, or mix well with a spoon <br>before using it again. <br><br>TIP: When doubling the recipe, DON’T automatically double the water.<br>Often that can lead to runny icing. Use about 2/3s the amount of water at first, <br>and add more if it’s too dry.<br><br>* meringue powder is a dried egg white product used in place of fresh egg whites<br>that does away with the danger of salmonella inherent in using uncooked egg products.<br>It's available in craft stores that carry Wilton Cake Decorating Products<br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 04:27 PM

OH MY FLIPPIN' MEATBALL!<br><br>Your posts aren't using the <TT><B><center></B></TT> tags!<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 04:31 PM

<center><br><br><br><br><h1>[color:purple]I thought about it, then <br>decided it was unnecessary</font color=purple></h1><br><br><br><br><br></center><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 05:03 PM

That is beautiful. Too pretty to eat. <br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 05:21 PM

Well, neither is my creation...<br>but it does give me some fresh ideas.<br>The Gum-Paste flowers I've seen can hardy <br>be believed! And yes, that's one of the reasons <br>I'd taken to filling mine with chocolate... it's <br>to actively encourage people to break it up and <br>eat it, since, yes I've been told that they are too <br>beautiful to eat.<br><br>I forgot to add into the description of the properties<br>of my royal icing, that they work well as very long<br>and elegant icicles. <br>The other thing I should mention, is if you go into<br>competition, EVERYTHING has to be Entirely EATABLE,<br>even the Windows. That technicality can backfire when <br>people employ things like Rock Salt, or uncooked pasta,<br>but the effects can be astounding, although I personally<br>would no longer be considered eatable.<br><br>But for the fun of it, anything goes. so have FUN!<br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 05:36 PM

BTW... I went to Macy's after Christmas and bought<br>the Cuisinart Griller/Panini Press for my Significant<br>Other, who'd spent the Holiday in the hospital following<br>his sudden & totally unexpected heart-attack. <br><br>It's been a HUGE help encouraging him to eat a liter diet.<br>We've been finding new combinations of foods, that cook <br>up quick, searing in flavor, and grilling veggies along side<br>and turning them into crunchy wraps. We're fortunate to <br>live in a multi-cultural area of the country, so finding<br>exotic breads, spices & even fresh vegetables isn't a hard.<br><br>Do you have any suggestions or favorites you can share? <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 05:54 PM

<blockquote><font size=1>In reply to:</font><hr><p>BTW... I went to Macy's after Christmas and bought<br>the Cuisinart Griller/Panini Press for my Significant<br>Other, who'd spent the Holiday in the hospital following<br>his sudden & totally unexpected heart-attack. <br><br>It's been a HUGE help encouraging him to eat a liter diet.<br>We've been finding new combinations of foods, that cook <br>up quick, searing in flavor, and grilling veggies along side<br>and turning them into crunchy wraps. We're fortunate to <br>live in a multi-cultural area of the country, so finding<br>exotic breads, spices & even fresh vegetables isn't a hard.<br><br>Do you have any suggestions or favorites you can share? <p><hr></blockquote><p>I'm sorry to hear about your SO having a heart attack! OMG. My son bought us a Cuisinart Griller/Panini Press for Christmas and we used it for the first time this morning. We made bacon and eggs on it, which we shouldn't do very often because my husband has high cholesterol and is on high blood pressure medication. But that's what they wanted for breakfast... At least I felt better making it on the Cuisinart, because of the way it drains all the grease away from the food. Sigh... <br><br>It's so hard to eat healthy, but I think the Cuisinart will help a lot in that department. Let me know of any good recipes you come up with. I'm still learning how to use it, but I like it a lot so far! <br><br>
Posted by: lanovami

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 07:29 PM

My mother offered to reheat some take out pizza for me while I was home. She did a fine job I must say....<br><br>We are what we repeatedly do. -Aristotle
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/13/08 07:32 PM

Makes a great quick breakfast. Really, not kidding. Beats soup, that's for sure. <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/14/08 03:04 AM

I did a LOT of online research before making the purchase.<br>The starting point was the PICTURED You'd Posted of the Cuisiart Griddler.<br>OK, First off, I made a mistake (above) I Said "GRILLER" it is the "GRIDDLER"<br>that I went with (yes... there are TWO Different Models the Griddler being the<br>More Expensive of the 2 because it includes the 2 Extra Non-Stick Surfaces.)<br>[color:white]. . . . . . . . . . . . </font color=white><br>In tests across the board in several different APPLIANCE TESTING WEB-SITES <br>The Variable Temp Model you showed the best Cuisinart has to offer, and was <br>judged superior over all G.Forman type indoor grills. Your Son chose well! <br><br>The only negative marks was the grease... that it still *pops* and spatters...<br>and worst of all... Drips Down the back of the press when the top's opened. <br>So I lined a Pizza Box with foil using double-sided tape that I can fold up and<br>set aside until I come up with something better, and set the Griddler upon a <br>CORNING CounterSaver and clean any possible drips afterward. Since I'm<br>trimming the meat beforehand, the only problem so far is HamBurger Meat.<br><br>I'm not crazy about the breakfasts yet, but I'll try to learn to regulate the temp.<br>better and try try again... but everything else (INCLUDING The Burgers) <br>has been first rate! Searing the meat and draining the fat makes everything<br>taste better some how. <br><br>Even when I broil the meat, I still use the griller... since our favorite meals have <br>resulted from slicing cooked meats and combining them with either cold salad with <br>a hint of heart healthy dressing, or grilled veggies then toasting the resulting wraps.<br>[color:white]. . . . . . . . . . . . </font color=white><br>I'm anxious to try Indian & Middle-Eastern Greek & Syrian Breads & Fillers.<br>We need to get Waleed in here to share some savory meat recipes & side dishes.<br>Mmm Coriander, Cardamon... and steamed rice with dates & honey & rose water.... <br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 05:10 AM

As Head Jack Ass I take my job and responsibilities seriously. That is why I need to ask if I post in this thread about how best to serve revenge (hot or cold), or how many hearts of republican are required for a luncheon (many as they are so so small), will this thread need to be moved to the political soapbox? <br><br>Even the brined breast of the Poo-tee-weet is political (if you don't read the soapbox you don't know what I am talking about, sorry). Vonnegut would and did make the posting of a simple asterisk or semicolon a political statement.<br><br>Just a jackass checking on the rules. <br><br>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 08:08 AM

In Thailand I had a really good mock jackass curry once. I'll see if I can drum up the recipe.<br><br>- padmavyuha<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 11:04 AM

Never had a really good borscht; and I understand it can be super tasty. I suppose you have to like all the ingredients, which I do. Not a huge fan of plain beets, but there's enough other stuff in there to modify their plain flavor.<br><br>In fact, I'm not sure I've ever had <B><I>any</B></I> borscht. I gotta try it sometime.<br><br>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 11:31 AM

Borscht needs a good dollop of sour cream in it, but most especially a good dollop of fresh, chopped dill weed (ukrop, in Russian) - mmm, mmm... it's really good cold, with chopped up cucumber in it too.<br><br>- padmavyuha<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 11:43 AM

The reason I even brought it up was that somewhere yesterday I came across a site where the author posted a recipe for what he called the best borscht he ever had. It was his grandmother's recipe and he'd been eating it all his life. Apparently, Grandma had a few little tricks that transformed the soup from a proletarian staple to a divine treat.<br><br>It sounded really good, but I can't find it again today.<br><br>"This is not here."
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 11:45 AM

And don't skimp on the balsamic vinegar, the onion, and especially a parsnip or two along with that big dollop of sour cream. Borscht should be nice and rich tasting. I love beets now, and parsnips and turnips and all those root vegetables. We make some nice hot cream of root vegetable soups in the winter. Potatoes for substance but a parsnip or turnip for that tang done with cream. Now I'm hungry.<br><br>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 12:53 PM

Mmm - I just had a big bowl of leek and butternut squash soup with butterbeans and pinto beans and rice and veggie sausage in it - and plenty of ginger and chili, as it's winter! My fire is stoked... plus I've just discovered marjoram, and I think I'm in love...<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 02:09 PM

I'll bite (but then, I'll try anything once ) ~ what's mock jackass and is it always curried? <br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 02:33 PM

Erm... well, it's just that with all this talk of ostrich and antelope, and with this being a food thread, and jackass got mentioned... but then I'm a vegetarian, so it had to be mock jackass. Sorry. Sorry. Actually, I've never come across any reference to a culture that eats donkey. Anyone? (and no burrito jokes.)<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 02:42 PM

Great, now I'll never be able to take you seriously again.<br><br><br><br> <br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: iRock

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 02:50 PM

We had this last week and it was wonderful. Rick made it and he used a California Pinot Grigio.<br><br><br>Original Article:<br>Recipe: French country chicken with mushroom sauce<br><br>Dietitian's tip: These boneless, skinless chicken breasts are sauteed and topped with a creamy mushroom sauce. Serve over whole-wheat spaghetti or fettuccini with a steamed broccoli-carrot blend on the side.<br><br>SERVES 4<br>Ingredients<br><br>4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, each 4 ounces<br>2 tablespoons olive oil<br>4 shallots, thinly sliced<br>1/4 pound mushrooms, thinly sliced<br>1 tablespoon all-purpose (plain) flour<br>1/4 cup white wine<br>1/2 cup low-sodium chicken stock<br>1 tablespoon fresh rosemary (or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary)<br>2 tablespoons chopped parsley<br><br>Directions<br><br>Place the chicken breasts between wax paper and pound with a mallet to flatten. Cut each piece in half lengthwise. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm.<br><br>In a small frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and saute for about 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes more, stirring occasionally.<br><br>In a small bowl, whisk together the flour and wine until all the lumps are gone. Add the flour mixture to the shallots and mushrooms. Stir in the chicken stock and cook over medium-high heat. Stir until the sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add the rosemary.<br><br>In a large, nonstick skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the chicken and saute until no longer pink or until a thermometer inserted into the chicken reads 170 F, about 5 minutes.<br><br>To serve, transfer 2 chicken breast halves onto each plate. Spoon mushroom sauce over the chicken and garnish with parsley. Serve immediately.<br><br>Nutritional Analysis<br><br>(per serving)<br>Serving size: 2 chicken breast halves<br>Calories 239 Cholesterol 66 mg<br>Protein 28 g Sodium 98 mg<br>Carbohydrate 6 g Fiber 0.5 g<br>Total fat 9 g Potassium 485 mg<br>Saturated fat 1 g Calcium 30 mg<br>Monounsaturated fat 5 g <br><br><br>By Mayo Clinic Staff <br>Jan 1, 2005<br>© 1998-2008 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.com," "EmbodyHealth," "Reliable tools for healthier lives," "Enhance your life," and the triple-shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.<br>NU00505<br><br>link<br><br>oh yeah, that's going in the blog
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 03:01 PM

<blockquote><font size=1>In reply to:</font><hr><p>what's mock jackass<p><hr></blockquote><p>You have to ask?<br><br><br><br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 03:08 PM

<br><br>He's not the real deal?<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 03:12 PM

Ya got me! <br><br>&#63743; &#63743; &#63743; &#63743;
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 03:18 PM

Wonder if we made him look. <br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 03:31 PM

Do I smell something burning? Curry?<br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 04:13 PM

I think I'm supposed to mock you for asking that.<br><br><br>"That's not curry, that's your ass . . . "<br><br><br>I'm not very good at this. Any suggestions?<br><br><br><br><br>Edit: Winky! I dropped my winky! I may have offended! God, I need a badge or something. <br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Lea on 01/22/08 07:14 PM (server time).</EM></FONT></P>
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 04:19 PM

You want suggestions in mockery? You can't afford my rates. I'm sure some plebeian jackass will step forward. Head jackasses don't teach mockery. They just do it.<br><br><br>
Posted by: Lea

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 04:24 PM

<br><br><br>I am rendered speechless by the Head Jackass, but I will laugh to tell the tail.<br><br><br><br><br><br>[color:blue]I always deserve it. Really.</font color=blue><br><br>
Posted by: padmavyuha

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/22/08 04:40 PM

Mock ye not...<br><br>[color:purple]A lopsided man runs best along the little side-hills of success<br>- Frank Moore Colby</font color=purple>
Posted by: OSXaddict

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/31/08 05:35 AM

here's a great soup that is easy to make:<br><br>Tortilla soup <br><br>1 can of chicken or cooked chicken<br>1 can of corn<br>1 can of refried beans<br>1 can of black or red beans<br>1 can of chicken broth<br>shredded cheese<br>salsa<br><br>Mix all the canned stuff with some salsa in a pot and heat.<br>Medium heat and stir until refried beans are melted. <br>Cover and let simmer for around 14 minutes, stirring occasionally.<br><br>Put fritos, corn chips, or crackers in bowl, add soup, top with cheese<br><br><br>my photos
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/31/08 08:14 AM

<A HREF=http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/comments/cheesy_hominy/>[color:TEAL]<U>Saw this on the J-Walk blog</U></FONT></A> a few days ago. Looks like it might find a home in the comfort food file. And I agree with J-Walk & his wife...I'd used some cheese other than plain ol' American.<br><br><B>Cheesy Hominy</B><br><br><I>Ingredients</I><br> * 1 egg<br> * 2 cans (15-1/2 ounces each) white or yellow hominy, rinsed and drained<br> * 12 ounces process American cheese, cube<br> * 3/4 cup milk<br> * 1/2 small onion, finely chopped<br> * 3 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled<br> * 1 tablespoon butter, melted<br> * 1/4 teaspoon pepper<br> * Chopped fresh parsley, optional<br><br>Directions:</I><br>In a large bowl, beat egg. Add hominy, cheese, milk, onion, bacon, butter and pepper; mix well. Spoon into a greased 11-in. x 7-in. x 2-in. baking dish.<br> Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 45 minutes or until bubbly and top begins to brown. Let stand a few minutes before serving. Garnish with parsley if desired. Yield: 8 servings.<br><br>[i]"This is not here."
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/31/08 07:32 PM

[color:red]Low Fat</font color=red> GREEK EGGPLANT MOUSSAKA<br><br>1 clove garlic, minced<br>1 tsp. [color:red]sea</font color=red>salt<br>1/4 tsp. pepper<br>1 lb. ground chuck<br>2 tbsp. <s>butter</s>[color:red]olive oil</font color=red> <br>1 lg. onion, chopped<br>1 tbsp. chopped parsley<br>1 c. tomato sauce<br>2 sm. eggplants<br><s>Vegetable</s> [color:red]Olive</font color=red> oil<br>Cream sauce<br>Parmesan cheese<br><br>Add garlic salt and pepper to ground chuck; fry in <s>butter</s> [color:red]olive oil</font color=red> until browned. Add onion, parsley and tomato sauce; simmer 15 minutes. Slice eggplants, soak in deep bowl of [color:red]sea</font color=red>salt water about 15 minutes. Drain, squeeze slices to remove excess moisture.<br><br><s>Fry in hot vegetable oil; place on paper towel to absorb oil.</s> [color:red]Griddle brushed lightly with olive oil</font color=red>Arrange layers of eggplant pieces alternately with meat mixture in deep 9 inch square baking pan, ending with eggplant. Spread cream sauce over top. Sprinkle with grated Parmesan cheese. Bake in 350 degree oven for 30 minutes.<br><br>CREAM SAUCE:<br><br><s>4 butter</s>[color:red]2 butter 2 olive oil</font color=red>tbsp. butter<br>3 tbsp. flour<br>2 c. [color:red]non fat dry</font color=red>milk<br><s>3 egg yolks</s>[color:red]EggBeaters</font color=red><br>[color:red]Sea</font color=red>Salt and pepper to taste<br><br>Melt butter, add flour and stir until golden brown. Add milk gradually, stirring until thickened. Add sauce to slightly beaten egg yolks, a tablespoon at a time. Cook over low heat until thickened. Season.<br><br>Serves 6.<br><br>[color:red]Alterations</font color=red>: Olive oil instead of butter is much more heart healthy. Sea Salt has almost 1/2 the sodium of mined salt, EggBeaters have a fraction of the cholesterol of eggs. Grilling the eggplant steamed them tender, and browned them lightly using less than a teaspoon of olive oil (and no need for the paper towels.)<br>Non fat dry milk over whole milk.<br><br>The rest was done as recommended. and rose and browned beautifully like a soufflé', and was out of this world.<br><br>I'm finding it pretty easy to switch to healthier cooking just using common sense. <br><br>UP-DATE<br>My BF just came home from his post-operative check-up.<br>His doctor was so pleased with his progress that he told my BF to not bother coming back for 3 months. <br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: GingerBreadMan

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 02/06/08 03:59 PM

I like cooking simple meals with ingredients I really like. Tonight is Beef Stroganof.<br><br>Here's my recipe<br>---------------------<br><br>1 pound of beef<br>1 red onion - about the size of a softball<br>About 2 cups of mushrooms - Brown and Portabella are good - a mushroom with an earthy taste to it<br>1 cup of sherry - the real deal, not cooking sherry<br>1 cup of sour cream<br><br>others- salt, pepper, paprika, meat tenderizer, olive oil, beef bouline cubes.<br><br>First prepare beef. You can use an type. Cheap cuts like stewing beef or expesive cuts like beef tenderloin, work equally well. Stewing beef should be tenderized.<br><br>Slice beef into strips. For cheaper cuts tenderize with a mallet then use some meat tenderizer power - sprinkle on and let sit for 30 minutes.<br><br>Cut mushrooms into nice size chunks. Put onion in food processor and dice it.<br><br>Season beef with pepper and paprika. Quickly brown beef and then remove.<br><br>Put mushrooms, onions, about tablespoon of oil and sherry into pot or sauce pan. Cook for about 5 minutes on medium. Add beef boulien cubes to quarter cup of hot water, mix and then add to pot. Add beef. Stir, cook, stir for 2 minutes.<br><br>Let the pot simmer for 45 minutes or so, until sherry has reduced and beef is tender. Add sour cream, mix. Let stand for 5 minutes.<br><br>Serve over rice or broad egg noodles. Enjoy with a nice glass of red wine.<br><br>I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left.
Posted by: choker

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 02/12/08 05:40 PM

That sounded like what the doctor ordered.<br>Dinner will be served<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 02/12/08 07:18 PM

<blockquote><font size=1>In reply to:</font><hr><p>My BF just came home from his post-operative check-up.<br>His doctor was so pleased with his progress that he told my BF to not bother coming back for 3 months.<p><hr></blockquote><p>Way to go!<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 02/13/08 05:35 AM

THANK YOU! I hold YOU Responsible!<br>(Or at least you (and your son) helped)<br>Reading about the Griddler was a GOD SEND!<br><br>We've been using it 3-5 times a week since X-Mas.<br>I'm getting really good at adopting dishes that were tasty <br>(but not necessarily good for you) to JUST AS Tasty but better<br>for you. "SMART COOKING" lol I've yet to buy a Grilling Cookbook,<br>I've just been winging it so far... but my BF is DELIGHTED with every<br>thing we've cooked so far. At this point it would be hard to go back to eating<br>deep-fried meat-products, drenched in heavy sauces. ~ WAY TO GO ~ INDEED!<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 03/05/08 11:34 AM

<br>Man! I wish this Thread WERE "SELF-RISING"!!!<br>I had a heck of a time locating it to get my own recipe<br>for the Low-Fat GREEK EGGPLANT MOUSSAKA. <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 01:34 PM

Well, just like good dough, you gotta work it properly if you want it to rise.<br><br><br><br>"This is not here."
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 03:31 PM

<br>Not altogether sure if you deserve a *smack* for that... <br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 04:19 PM

Just wanted to float this thread back to the top as an eyeball reminder for all of us here.<br><br>Nothing more than that.<br><br>"This is not here."
Posted by: iBookmaster

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 04:37 PM

Is this the "my borther's iMac gets him chicks" thread at MacMinute? <br><br>
Posted by: MacBozo

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 05:05 PM

OK. I'll admit that this is the first time I've visited this thread. How many actual recipes are posted here and has anyone compiled them into an easily searchable PDF or data base?<br><br>
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 05:20 PM

Yar, I also reckoned that The Refugees prolly dint know it existed<br>so now was indeed a good time to POP it to the TOP for a Look-See,<br>especially with Bar-B-Que Season on the horizon. <br><br>No, it hain't been indexed (be our guest) but it's better than losing<br>every recipe that members are generous enough to share, the <br>second it falls off the end of the page. ... Besides, most of the shares<br>are in the course of conversation in hundreds of unrelated threads.<br><br>Phosphor finally took the initiative too open the Thread as a TOPIC.<br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/16/08 05:43 PM

<OL><B>"Phosphor finally took the initiative too open the Thread as a TOPIC."</B></OL>Prezactly.<br><br>If I may—for the eleventyseventh time—reference the difference between here & MCF, and the Adobe Photoshop Lounge...<br><br>Over there, we've established a forum culture where the regulars know to keep adding to focused threads, so that info is gathered in one place, and to keep them from dropping off into the abyss. The Lounge over there isn't archived, so we all have to pay attention.<br><br>We have long-standing threads about many different subjects:<br><br>• books<br>• movies<br>• YouTube stuff<br>• Music we're currently listening to<br>• R.I.P.<br>• Stuff that pisses us off<br>• Stuff that makes us happy<br>• Pets<br>• Stupid questions asked by drooling slack-jawed Adobe apps users in other sub-forums<br>• Favorite quotes<br>• Jokes<br>• "What's on the menu?"<br>• a few dedicated sports threads<br>• Political discussion<br>• Geeky science stuff<br>• Amazingly cool, neato, whiz-bang stuff<br><br>...among others.<br><br>Many of them go to 1,000 posts or more, and quite a few of them are on their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th incarnations, stemming from a time when the Mods would close threads after they reached 1,000 or so posts. And sure, those threads meander and we have a lot of off-topic fun, but by and large, the content always gets steered back to the focus of the original posts.<br><br>Now, understand that I'm not saying the culture that arose spontaneously and informally by the Adobe Photoshop Lounge regulars is better than the culture here, it's just different. <br><br>But having those constantly active and focused threads sure seems to have precipitated a good spirit of cooperation. There's even a thread dedicated to the memory of one of our long-time pals who died suddenly last year. We were given the choice to make it sticky, but chose not to, so that we must remember to be vigilant, to manually float it to the top, to keep his memory alive. It's like tending an annual flower garden that was planted in his honor.<br><br>"This is not here."
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/17/08 03:35 AM

MOST other forums are set up like that...<br>I prefer it that way. Yes, in MacFora there are<br>defined forums: Software, Hardware, Programing<br>and so forth... even a Gallery...<br>but there are also long running threads in the Lounge.<br>The PUB Thread is the catchall where we pull up a stool<br>and a virtual drink (always on the Tab of course) the PUB is <br>maintained by a REAL Bartender who tends a real Pub in London<br>the FOOD Thread was started by one of the Mods who owns a restaurant<br>in New Orleans... the Music Thread is maintained by some old geezer who<br>lives in a converted church (a la' ALICE'S RESTAURANT) in 'Amishland', PA.<br>well, he's a lover of music... but in reality, 'TheAppleDoctor' is just that... a<br>MacHardware certified go to guy.<br><br>To tell the truth, the only SubForum that comes & goes is the Political Forums<br>usually started when the discussion all over the board turns to politics every 4 yrs.<br>and is usually hosed down after the elections when things calm back down again... I like<br>it that way.. it's great having an Admin that keeps his fingers on the pulse of the goings on.<br>He has a good feel for what's needed when & where. <br><br>Ah well... whatever... sorry...doan wanna get too far off topic here. <br><br>People seem to prefer this simple software ...where things just keep slipping away...personally<br>I still don't 'get' the charm of it myself.<br><br>I just checked... even my personal thread for over 6 years is over 1600 posts long<br><br>I hadn't realized that the PUB thread was well over 31,000 Posts Long<br><br><br><br>[color:green]"...or am I a butterfly that's dreaming she's a woman?"</font color=green> [color:green]. . . _ _ _ . . .</font color=green><br><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Celandine on 05/17/08 08:05 AM (server time).</EM></FONT></P>
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 05/17/08 07:38 AM

<OL><B>"the Music Thread is maintained by some old geezer who<br>lives in a converted church (a la' ALICE'S RESTAURANT) in 'Amishland', PA."</B></OL>And what more can you tell me about this guy? I might know of him, or of the place he lives.<br><br>Anyway...Sub-forums that are focused on certain topics are one thing, and their creation is under the control of admins. But it's up to the regular users if they want to maintain long-standing threads like this one, no matter what software is being used to run a place like this.<br><br>"This is not here."
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/15/09 07:59 AM

Perhaps I should clean up this thread with the off-topic stuff?

Anyway, found this and might try it this weekend when the Steelers whip up on the Ravens!

Bloody Mary Chicken Wings

15 whole, fresh chicken wings

Bloody Mary Rub
2 tablespoons celery salt
1 tablespoon good-quality chili powder
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon granulated onion
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
1 teaspoon brown sugar
½ teaspoon cayenne

Bloody Mary Sauce
1 ½ cups V-8 juice
3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
3 tablespoons Tabasco Garlic Sauce
1 lemon, juiced
1 teaspoon salt
Prepared horseradish (optional)

Russian vodka for serving (optional)
Celery sticks for serving (optional)

With a sharp knife, cut the tips off the chicken wings and save the tips for stock. Slash the inside of each wing joint to help them cook more evenly, but don’t cut them all the way through.

In a small bowl, mix together the rub ingredients. Sprinkle over the chicken wings, coating them evenly.

Prepare the grill for cooking over direct medium heat. Grill the wings, turning often, for 30 minutes, or until the wings are crispy and golden.

Meanwhile, mix the sauce ingredients together and set aside. Put the vodka in the freezer.

Transfer the wings to an aluminum foil pan. Pour the sauce over the wings, tossing to coat. Put the pan on the grill. Cover the grill and cook for another 30 minutes, tossing the wings after 15 minutes to coat. If the pan goes dry, add a small amount of beer to keep it from burning. Remove the wings to a plate, and drizzle with the sauce if there is any left. Serve with celery sticks and shots of ice-cold vodka.

Makes 15 servings.
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/15/09 08:24 AM

Mac N Cheese

Makes: 1- 9x9 pan (very full!)
Ingredients:
3 cups of dry noodles (nice big round are good)

Sauce:
1/4 c. margarine
1/4 cup flour
2 c. milk
cheeses (I used what was in the house: sharp cheddar and velveta)
salt, pepper, red pepper, Italian seasoning, dried chives

Other:
sauteed mushrooms (I used 3 good sized ones)
1/4 package Farmer John sausage (the "crumbly kind")
one more cheese (for topping, I used Monterrey Jack)
crushed croutons (I used Garlic Herb)

Directions:
Sautee mushrooms/cook sausage - combine and set aside
Boil noodles in water for about 8-10 minutes (not too soft!)
Make the sauce: melt 1/4 c. margarine, add 1/4 cup flour to make paste. Heat 2 c. milk on high for 2-3 minutes. Add paste to milk, add 2 cheeses, add spices. Heat again to melt cheeses.
Drain noodles, stir in mushrooms, sausage, cheese sauce.
Put mixture in 9x9 pan. Cover with 3rd cheese, then crushed croutons.
Put in oven at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes, or until sauce bubbles and croutons turn dark brown.
Posted by: Mississauga

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 01/15/09 10:07 AM

From FoodTV.ca

Bloody Mary Salmon
1 cup tomato juice
2 ounces vodka
1 tsp horseradish
A few splashes of Worcestershire sauce
2 tbsp lemon juice
Large splash olive oil
1 x stalk celery, chopped
2 x salmon filets, 6 oz each

DIRECTIONS:

Pour tomato juice, vodka, horseradish, Worcestershire, lemon juice, olive oil and celery into a shallow pan.
Bring to a gentle simmer and add salmon filets.
Cover with a tight fitting lid and let salmon poach in the liquid for about 10-12 minutes, until it is just cooked through.
Serve with Mint and Pea Puree

Mint and Pea Puree
1 cup frozen peas
2 tbsp olive oil
1/2 cup water
Salt and pepper
1 x small bunch fresh mint leaves

DIRECTIONS:

Place peas, oil, water and salt and pepper into a small pot and bring to a simmer.
Cook for about 5 minutes, until the peas are bright green and cooked through.
Remove from heat and add mint leaves.
Puree with an immersion blender until smooth, or alternately puree in a blender.
Posted by: Anonymous

Meat Pie to Die For! - 01/15/09 07:09 PM

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BO__qqiq_q4[/video]
Posted by: macdavid

Re: Meat Pie to Die For! - 01/18/09 02:56 PM

yumm. Can't wait to try this. I loved the line, "There's no such thing as too much garlic." Yesssss.

I'm baking up a new-found recipe of triple chocolate cookies at this moment. When they're done, I'll post the recipe... after extensive and thorough sampling, of course.
Posted by: macdavid

Re: Meat Pie to Die For! - 01/18/09 03:25 PM

Well, I have to say, right off the bat, that getting the globs of chocolate dough onto the baking sheet is the messiest cooking experience imaginable. But... was it worth it? OH, YES!
----------

CULINARY SOS
Milk's ooey-gooey double-chocolate cookies

Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times
CHOCOLATE: Are these the best cookies, ever?
By Noelle Carter
January 14, 2009

Dear SOS: The best cookies I've ever had -- ever, anywhere -- are the ooey-gooey double-chocolate cookies at Milk. Can you persuade them to part with the recipe?

Meghan Rose
Los Angeles

Dear Meghan: Have your napkins and a big glass of milk at the ready for this recipe. Three types of chocolate are folded into this rich cookie dough, which is baked just long enough for each cookie to set up on the outside while remaining oh so "ooey-gooey" inside. Messy? Yes, but perfectly so.

Milk's ooey-gooey double-chocolate cookies

Total time: 40 minutes, plus 1 hour chilling time for the batter
Servings: 1 1/2 dozen
Note: Adapted from Bret Thompson of Milk in Los Angeles.

1/4 pound (4 ounces) unsweetened chocolate
4 tablespoons ( 1/2 stick) butter
3 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup flour
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 pound bittersweet chocolate (chunks or chips)

1. In a bowl set over a pot of simmering water, melt the unsweetened chocolate and butter. Remove from the heat and cool slightly.

2. In the bowl of a mixer with a paddle attachment, or in a large bowl using a fork, combine the eggs, vanilla and sugar. Mix just until incorporated and set aside.

3. Sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt into a medium bowl. Set aside.

4. Add the melted chocolate to the egg mixture and mix just until combined. Stir in the sifted dry ingredients and mix just until combined, then stir in the bittersweet chocolate.

5. Cover the batter with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour to chill thoroughly. Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

6. Divide the dough into 18 portions. Grease your hands (to prevent the dough from sticking) and shape the portions into balls. Place the balls on a greased, parchment-lined sheet pan, leaving 2 to 3 inches between each.

7. Bake until the edges of the cookies are just set and the center is still soft, 10 to 12 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through. Place the cookies, still on the parchment, on a rack and cool completely before serving. They will be very soft.

Each cookie: 251 calories; 4 grams protein; 29 grams carbohydrates; 3 grams fiber; 18 grams fat; 9 grams saturated fat; 42 mg. cholesterol; 92 mg. sodium.

Posted by: macdavid

Re: Meat Pie to Die For! - 01/18/09 07:41 PM

Some follow up:

WOW! Those cookies pack a punch. I had two this afternoon and felt a chocolate "rush" for hours. Reminded me of when I've ordered the most decadent chocolate desert in a restaurant and then felt "bombed" for the rest of the night. Powerful stuff.
Posted by: Celandine

SELF RISING (from the dead) FOOD THREAD - 04/19/09 08:01 PM





bUmP


Posted by: soulotomy

Dessert - 04/19/09 10:52 PM

Oh, that sounds good. Love dessert.

I'll have to get my wife's recipe for a bomb/bombe? thing. I assume it's killer, but have no personal experience of it, as our dinner guests devoured it so ravenously and thoroughly that none was left for me (after I had stepped outside for just a few minutes to have a quick drink and toke with a friend), requests for the recipe, near legendary status amoung that party's guests, etc, etc.

However, one of my alltime favorite standbys is pretty simple. Take a good ball of white chocolate cookie dough (scratch is best, but those pre-made store-bought buckets or rolls work, too). Bake a nice small pancake sized cookie, soft, thickish. Put on some good dollops of good rich vanilla ice cream (again, scratch is better, but store bought works). Spoon on some really good preserves (I like raspberry or strawberry) that you've cooked with some Cointreau or VSOP (or regular brandy) or in keeping (a fruit based higher test distilled alcohol, of complimentary flavor) (kind of cool looking, too, as this stuff will flame briefly). Kind of a really satisfying, intoxicating, sensual down-home decadence, but anything that killer would pass muster on any table anywhere.

Ed
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: Dessert - 05/27/09 06:03 PM

Whoa.

Honey-Baked Ham Cupcakes

Whoa!

I mean...full speed ahead!!!
Posted by: trey

Re: Dessert - 05/27/09 09:48 PM

I just cooked myself dinner for the first time in about, oh eight or nine months. All I have right now is a borrowed sauté pan and some silverware, so tonight's fare was:

two green plantains, which were peeled and sliced into medallions ranging from one eighth to about three quarters inch thick. These go into a nearly smoking-hot pan of olive oil so that they're just bathing, not floating. Flip a couple of times 'till they're golden brown, put on a paper towel, generously apply Tony Chachere's, and, Ta daaa... instant bachelor food!


wink
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: Dessert - 05/27/09 10:32 PM

Try letting the plantains get really ripe and then frying them. Let them get black so that you'd think they're rotten. You'll be surprised at the difference in flavor.
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: Dessert - 05/28/09 03:54 AM

I had plantains in Uganda and they boil them to make a sort of mashed potato look to them. Good stuff!
Posted by: trey

Re: Dessert - 05/28/09 04:47 AM

Do they get sweet when they're ripe?
Posted by: yoyo52

Re: Dessert - 05/28/09 08:59 AM

They get nice and sweet when they're ripe, but not super-sweet. It's terrific with picadillo and rice. I love the green fried plantain as well. You can't grow up in the Afro-Caribbean without liking that stuff in all its forms smile

And John, we have the same mashed plantain thing, which we call fufu de platano verde.

Try saying fufu fast five times without laughing.

laugh
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: Dessert - 05/28/09 02:02 PM

Found a new recipe site:

http://foodgawker.com/popular/favorites/

Posted by: lesh

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/13/09 09:40 AM

*bump*

Poly's fish tales reminded me I wanted to post this recipe. I use it on bluefish more often than mackerel. It cuts through the oiliness quite well. It's originally from the NY Times.

Baked Mackerel In Mustard-Scallion Sauce

TOTAL TIME 1 hour (including marinating)
COOK TIME 20 minutes
PREP TIME 40 minutes

Ingredients
2 1/2 to 2 3/4 pound whole mackerel, cleaned, gutted but left whole
1/2 lemon
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup creme fraiche
2 tablespoons prepared whole-grain mustard
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 scallions, finely chopped, including the green tops
Salt, if desired

Preparation
1. Score the mackerel on both sides, making two or three large X's one-half-inch deep with a small sharp knife. Squeeze the half lemon over the fish.
2. Combine and stir the remaining ingredients. Coat the mackerel with this mixture and allow to marinate one-half hour. Turn once during the marinating so the cuts in the fish are well coated with the sauce.
3. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
4. Place mackerel in a small buttered oval baking dish and bake until the fish is opaque. Serve at once.

YIELD 2 servings

NOTE: Fillets can be used instead of whole fish and the fish can be grilled instead of baked. Adjust cooking time accordingly.
Posted by: polymerase

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/13/09 11:24 AM

While I am smoking my bluefish this weekend I will try out your recipe on a fresh caught blue if I am lucky. Got a 6:30AM high tide on Saturday so should be easy to grab one.

The creme fraiche, mustard and scallions sounds great. This now has me thinking about how my mother prepared Bluefish. She would dry the fillets, dust with salt and pepper and then coat them all over with mayonnaise before popping in the oven. She is immortalized with that recipe in the "Woods Hole Cookbook".

It has to be online. Yup Baked Bluefish in Mayonnaise. Counter intuitive but the mayo would make the bluefish much less oily. I like bluefish much more than Striped Bass. To me, stripers don't have much fish flavor. So I get to take home all the blues and hand them all my stripers but one.
Posted by: trey

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/20/09 06:38 PM

I've been meaning to post this video here, as this guy makes a real-deal roux:

[video:youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCyaoH1Avks[/video]

He makes a damned good gumbo, but I'm not too sure about the loose sausage. This is how I like to cook, but I can't find the good cajun/southern smoked sausage up here. frown
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/25/09 02:51 PM

I didn't add this to this thread. Absolutely great!

Turkey Quesadillas

SERVINGS
16
CATEGORY
Lower Fat
PREP
15 min.
COOK
5 min.
TOTAL
20 min.
INGREDIENTS
1 pound lean ground turkey
1 cup chopped red onion
1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup salsa
1 cup frozen corn
1 cup julienned sweet red pepper
1 can (4 ounces) chopped green chilies
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
8 flour tortillas (8 inches)
2 cups (8 ounces) shredded reduced-fat Mexican cheese blend

DIRECTIONS
In a large nonstick skillet, cook the turkey, onion and garlic over medium heat until meat is no longer pink; drain. Add zucchini, salsa, corn, red pepper and chilies. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until vegetables are tender. Stir in seasonings.
For each quesadilla, place one tortilla in an ungreased nonstick skillet. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup cheese. Top with 1/2 cup filling, then sprinkle with another 1/4 cup cheese. Cover with another tortilla. Cook over medium heat, carefully turning once, until lightly browned on both sides and cheese begins to melt. Cut into eight wedges. Yield: 4 quesadillas (8 wedges each).
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/25/09 02:53 PM

And the meatloaf:

Meatloaf
1lb ground beef chuck
1lb ground veal
1lb ground pork
1/4 cup onion
1/4 cup bell pepper
2 tablespoons A1 sauce
2 tablespoons Heinz 57 sauce
1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
12 saltine crackers crushed
2 eggs

glaze
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 cup ketchup
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup Heinz 57 sauce
1/4 cup A1 sauce
1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup molasses
tobasco to taste

350 degree oven for 1 hour after mixing the meatloaf together. Then cover with glaze and bake for another 30-45 minutes, until juices run clear in the middle.

for the glaze, you mix them all together in a saucepan and bring just to a boil, stirring well.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/25/09 05:12 PM


Sounds GREAT!
but can I venture a suggestion about using Ground Turkey?

Add some beef bullion, dissolved in a few tablespoons of water
during the last stage of "Browning" the turkey to actually
make it Brown.. and give it the familiar "BEEFY" taste.

We haven't used Ground Beef for going on 2 years now, and
really don't miss it at all (except as meatballs & meatloaf)
so I opt for meat sauce, and turkey loaf made into Greek
Styled GYRO loaf served with garlic cucumber, yogurt Tzatziki
sauce
.. LOL trust me .. it's better than it sounds. wink
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 03/01/10 10:56 AM

Originally Posted By: Chris N
"That's what I enjoy about these food and recipe threads."

This was due for a good floating.
Posted by: Phosphor

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 03/01/10 10:57 AM

I always loved the roasted chickens they have at B.J.'s Wholesale, because the flavor is infused all through the meat, and not just in the skin. So, I went looking for how that's done. After some research I came up with my own version of the recipe.

• 8 cups water
• 1/2 C. kosher salt
• 1/4 C. packed brown sugar
• 3 T. molasses
• 3 T. Crystal Hot Sauce
• 1 T. marjoram
• 1 T. whole peppercorns, crushed
• 1 T. whole allspice, crushed
• 2 t. ground ginger
• 2 t. liquid smoke
• 1/2 t. garlic powder
• 3 whole bay leaves

Bring to a boil and stir until salt dissolves. Cool to room temp. Add 4 cups cold water to brine. Remove giblets from chicken, rinse inside & out, drain well. Place brine & chicken into a container so that chicken is completely covered. Pop on a lid, and refrigerate for 12-24 hours, turning chicken several times.

When ready to roast, remove chicken from brine, discard brine. Rinse chicken and pat dry. Truss up as usual, brush skin of chicken with canola oil, place in uncovered roasting pan or on rotisserie. Roast until done (nice & brown on the outside, 180°F internally).

Or, go to the link below and find another recipe you like better!
http://xrl.us/bgtg3h (Link to www.google.com)
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 06/10/10 08:04 PM

Chicken Lo Mein

Ingredients

4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - cut into thin strips
5 teaspoons white sugar, divided
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1/2 cup soy sauce, divided
1 1/4 cups chicken broth
1 cup water
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 (12 ounce) package uncooked linguine pasta
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger root
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1/2 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced
6 green onions, sliced diagonally into 1/2 inch pieces
Directions

In a medium, non-reactive bowl, combine the chicken with 2 1/2 teaspoons of white sugar, 1 1/2 tablespoons vinegar and 1/4 cup soy sauce. Mix this together and coat the chicken well. Cover and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour.
In another medium bowl, combine the chicken broth, water, sesame oil and ground black pepper with the remaining sugar, vinegar and soy sauce. In a separate small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch with some of this mixture and slowly add to the bulk of the mixture, stirring well. Set aside.
Cook the linguine according to package directions, drain and set aside. Heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a wok or large saucepan over high heat until it starts to smoke. Add the chicken and stir-fry for 4 to 5 minutes, or until browned. Transfer this and all juices to a warm plate.
Heat the remaining vegetable oil in the wok or pan over high heat. Add the ginger, garlic, mushrooms and green onions, and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the reserved sauce mixture and then the chicken. Simmer until the sauce begins to thicken, about 2 minutes. Add the reserved noodles and toss gently, coating everything well with the sauce.




made this tonight..really good!
Posted by: Ben Dover

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 06/24/10 08:08 PM

Chipotle burritos. Chipotle's a chain of cheap, natural, hormone free, healthy Mex fast food, sort of like Baja Fresh, but more focused ( only burritos and tacos, beef, chicken, pork and vegetarian ). Anyway, they're killer three-pounders.

So, tonight it sounded good to knock off their burritos for dinner.

Prep:

Cilantro-lime rice. Fine chop up some cilantro and put it in the fluid along with lime juice and a touch of lime zest. A little salt. Minced garlic. Some minced onion. Touch of cumin or chili powder. Water. Bring to boil and put in rice, stir, simmer covered, stir occasionally; or just do it all in a rice cooker. Oh yeah, use Basmati rice, a lot more flavor and better texture.

Chipotle chicken. Just grill up some chicken sliced up into little chunks, in olive oil. Grill em up then finish them off with Lawry's Chipotle marinade - Finish em off enough that the marinade caramelizes a little.

Can of pinto beans.

Jumbo sized tortillas. Steam these in a microwave anyway you see fit, but steam them good. You could do a bit with them between damp towels, cloth or paper.

OK, then you just put a good dollop of the rice on a tortilla, then a dollop of pinto beans, then a dollop of the chicken. You could put other stuff, like fresh salsa, tomato, etc, but I prefer just the cilantro-lime rice, pinto beans, and chipotle chicken. Sour cream work, too, but not tonight ( no sour cream ). Or some fresh guacamole is killer, too ( but the kids killed that off for lunch, with nachos ).

Start to roll from one end, but not completely, then fold up and tuck the two sides, and finish rolling. That sucker should end up huge, a couple pounds at least.

They're big and delicious, so we just had them, a platter of mixed fruit ( strawberries, blueberries, melon slices, pineapple slices ), and Arnold Palmers ( half tea and half lemonade or thereabouts, my preference towards 2/3 lemonade topped with 1/3 tea ).

Cheap, fast, simple, delicious dinner, and somewhat healthy, too.

Ed
Posted by: John Rougeux

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 10/03/10 03:35 PM

Wow! This thread is 3 years old now!

Trying this tonight, so I don't know the outcome. It's currently baking.

Maple-Roasted Chicken with Vegetables

1 1/2lbs chicken (whatever floats your boat..we like boneless skinless chicken thighs)
Salt & Pepper
2 cups carrots, cut to 1" pieces (or baby carrots..which is what we used)
1/2 red onion, cut into 1" pieces
3/4 cup maple syrup
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp Thyme

It also calls for 3 cups sweet potatoes, peeled and cut to 1" pieces, but we didn't have any of that.
Also, it calls for poultry seasoning, to taste. We don't know what that is! heh

Arrange chicken in 8x13" baking dish. Sprinkle with the poultry seasoning, salt & pepper. Place carrots, sweet potatoes, and onion in the dish. Drizzle with maple syrup and olive oil. Sprinkle with Thyme and toss to coat.

Cover with foil and bake at 375 degrees F for 30 minutes. Remove foil, stir, and cook for about 15 minutes longer or until chicken is golden brown.

Let stand covered with foil for 5-8 minutes, then serve.

Before cooking

Click for full size
Posted by: Jim_

Stuffed tomatoes with feta, kalamata olives. - 02/19/12 10:34 AM

These are killer.

Feta cheese off of a block, cut into cubes to fit tomatoes
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for drizzling
1 tablespoon Balsamic vinegar
1.5 tablespoon minced shallot
1/2-3/4 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano, or dried, to taste
12-18 large cherry tomatoes
12-18 pitted Kalamata olives, halved lengthwise

Toss cubed feta, oil, vinegar, shallot, and oregano in small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Let marinade for at least an hour.
Cut tomatoes in half, across the equator. Scoop out tomato pulp with melon baller or small spoon, turn upside down for a few minutes on paper towel to drain.
Place tomatoes, cut side up, on serving plate. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Stuff hollowed cherry tomatoes with marinated feta.
Slide in olive half alongside cheese.
Drizzle with additional olive oil or marinade.
Do ahead: Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

I use no salt, and added the Balsamic vinegar to the recipe, I like a 3:1 oil to vinegar ratio. Cut the feta into whatever size will fit the tomatoes you have, enough to leave a bit of room for the olives. Also rather than drizzle with plain olive oil I use the marinade. The longer you marinade the feta the betta, an hour is fine but I like to go overnight. I've left the feta cubes in the marinade for a week, the feta won't get mushy, it softens just bit but it's still plenty firm. Keep the feta/marinade mix refrigerated if marinading overnight, and pull out an hour so ahead as the olive oil hardens. I've nuked it for about 5 secs or so if in a rush to melt the oil.

I've had them the next day and they are still fine, the tomatoes soften a bit and lose some flavor when refrigerated but they are still good with all of the other stuff in there.

You can stabilize them with a toothpick put in at an angle, and to make them less messy to eat. For home I don't, if taking them somewhere they transport better that way.

Posted by: Jim_

Jalapeño Cheese Soup - 02/19/12 10:45 AM

Jalapeño Cheese Soup

3-5 tablespoons butter
1 medium to large chopped white onion
1/3 cup flour
4 cups chicken broth
12 ounces shredded PepperJack Cheese with Jalapeño
2 cups half and half, you can substitute 1% or 2% milk, may just want to thicken a little longer
1 4.5-ounce can diced green chili peppers, juice and all
Pepper to taste
Tortilla chips of choice

In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Add the chopped onion. Cook and stir over medium heat until the onions are soft. Add the flour and whisk until combined. Cook for a minute or so to rid the flour of the raw taste. Slowly add the chicken broth while whisking. Cook and stir over medium heat until it thickens somewhat and bubbles. Cook and stir another few minutes.
Whisk in the half and half/milk. Reduce the heat; gradually add the cheese, whisking until the cheese is melted. Be careful not to overheat the cheese, it will break and get gritty. Add the diced green chili peppers and pepper. Heat through on very low heat until it thickens to taste.

Crumble the tortilla chips and either pour soup on top of some in a bowl or put on top for crispier chips.
Posted by: DLC

Re: Jalapeño Cheese Soup - 02/19/12 12:23 PM

Would You ALL Quit !!

you're makin me Hon-gry !! wink

gotta try that cheese soup.... you paying for my cholesterol /triglycerides meds ?? laugh
Posted by: Jim_

Re: Jalapeño Cheese Soup - 02/19/12 12:51 PM

LOL.

CLEAR!

The pint of half and half is 1/2 the fat, there's 58g of fat in the half and half. 1% only 4g per pint, 2% 10g.

It is sooo good though. crazy

Have it as a starter or with some tacos or something. I can eat half the batch if I have nothing else. blush I add some other hot sauce to my my portion, but as it is it's good for those that don't like a lot of spice. It's just spicy enough, more just a good jalepeño/chilis flavor.
Posted by: MrB

Re: Jalapeño Cheese Soup - 02/21/12 05:58 AM

Myoh my, this sounds delicious !

A couple months ago I bought one if those restaurant gallon sized jars of sliced jalapeños . Thought they would bethe same as the smaller jars ,but NO, much hotter. Don't know why. They are cut with thicker slices. Have more webbing so that might be it.

After my first taste of them I thought that i would have them around for a year, but have seen the jar become more empty until its on it's last few.

I made some salsa this week that would knock the socks off a lot of people. But so good.

Dave
Posted by: Celandine

No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/27/13 06:03 PM

.
..

[bUmP]

Greek Yogurt Cheesecake

Greek yogurt lends an unexpected tanginess to this light no-bake cheesecake.

Special Equipment
* A 9-inch-diameter springform pan

Ingredients
Crust
* Nonstick vegetable oil spray
* 1 1/2 cups fine graham cracker crumbs
* 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted, cooled slightly
* 1/4 cup sugar

Filling
* 2 teaspoons powdered gelatin
* 1 1/2 pounds cream cheese, room temperature
* 1 1/2 cups plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
* 3/4 cup sugar
* 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
* 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
* 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt


Preparation
Crust
* Coat bottom and sides of pan with nonstick spray. Line bottom with a parchment-paper round. Using your fingertips, mix remaining ingredients in a medium bowl until mixture holds together when pinched tightly. Pack onto bottom of pan in an even layer (using the bottom of a flat measuring cup works well). Chill until firm, at least 1 hour or up to 1 day.

Filling
* Place gelatin and 3 tablespoon cold water in a heatproof bowl. Let stand until softened, 5-10 minutes.
* Pulse cream cheese, yogurt, sugar, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt in a food processor, scraping down sides as needed, until completely smooth.
* Pour water to a depth of 1/2-inch into a small skillet over medium heat. Place bowl with gelatin in skillet; stir until gelatin dissolves, about 2 minutes. Remove bowl from skillet.
* With processor running, drizzle gelatin into cream cheese mixture; mix until well blended. Pour into prepared crust. Tap pan firmly on the counter to break up any big air bubbles. Smooth top. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and chill for at least 6 hours before serving.

DO AHEAD Cheesecake can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.
Posted by: DLC

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/27/13 07:35 PM

OMG !!


I'm still HON-GRY !!! wink
Posted by: Leslie

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/27/13 10:34 PM

David, you are a good man.
Posted by: DLC

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 05:56 AM

and you're one of the best MacBabes...

now please pass the potato salad !! laugh
Posted by: Pirate

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 07:19 AM

Who found this old thread......anyway thanks for bringing it to the top of the heap!!

Some one say Potato salad???well...

2 pounds clean, scrubbed new red potatoes
6 eggs
1 pound bacon
1 onion, finely chopped
1 stalk celery, finely chopped
2 cups mayonnaise
salt and pepper to taste

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add potatoes and cook until tender but still firm, about 15 minutes. Drain and set in the refrigerator to cool.
Place eggs in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil and immediately remove from heat. Cover and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool, peel and chop.
Place bacon in a large, deep skillet. Cook over medium high heat until evenly brown. Drain, crumble and set aside.
Chop the cooled potatoes, leaving skin on. Add to a large bowl, along with the eggs, bacon, onion and celery. Add mayonnaise, salt and pepper to taste. Chill for an hour before serving.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 08:19 AM

.
No wuckies... I'm a research assistant,
...it's "what I 'do' " wink

GAWD! That 'tater salad will be GREAT w/tonite's supper
...we're having 'Left-Overs' frown
but who'd mind left-over Alabama Style Pulled Pork? laugh

Save Room 4 the CHEESECAKE!
(My Yankee Contribution) wink
It's BIG...enough for all of us
((kindly pass out the plates & napkins))
thanx
.
Posted by: Pirate

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 08:22 AM











Sounds great..there is nothing better than two day old bbq pork...gives time for the flavor to soak in...potato salad and cheese just puts the iceing on the cake
Posted by: Celandine

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 08:38 AM

BTW...
Ted LURVS your ColeSlaw!
We'd be eating it on the Pulled Pork sandgies
had I made it to the market for the Cabbage.

or "Cabb-agh" as Jonathan Winters use'ta say. laugh
Posted by: Pirate

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 12:01 PM

Sure is good to go back and thumb thru the post...remembering all of those who don't post here as much as they use to
Posted by: Pirate

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 12:10 PM

Spring turkey season is in full swing, there's a lot of ways to cook a wild turkey, one of my favorites is wild turkey breast

1 wild turkey breast half
8 ounces zesty Italian salad dressing
8 ounces white wine
1 small reynolds oven cooking bag
creole seasoning
lemon pepper seasoning
1/2 cup butter
2/3 cup olive oil
Directions:


Mix the dressing and wine.

Pour into a 1 gallon size zip-lock bag.

Add the turkey breast and marinate overnight, turning at least once.

Drain off the marinade & discard.

Sprinkle turkey breast with the seasonings.

Place in oven roasting bag.

Melt the butter in the olive oil and add to the turkey breast.
Place the roasting bag & turkey breast in a 9"x5" loaf pan.
Bake at 350 degrees for 1 1/2 hours.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 04/28/13 04:38 PM

Hmmm... Vinegarette AND White Wine?
zounds like a Tender Bird!

Quote:

Harvesting Wild Turkey in N.J.

"There is now an abundance of wild turkeys throughout the state with turkeys found wherever there is suitable habitat. Even in South Jersey, where wild turkeys had been struggling just a few years ago, intensive restoration efforts have improved population numbers significantly. The population is estimated at 20,000 - 23,000 with an annual harvest of more than 3,000."


Posted by: Phosphor

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/05/13 10:23 AM

Holy Moley!
Look what happened today! It all comes back around.
(And yes, someone needs to start complaining about their Mom not microwaving stuff, or something... whistle wink )
Posted by: Celandine

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/05/13 12:42 PM


"Turkey Lurkey"...
...lurkin' right out front...!
t'wouldn't be no big deal if'n
I wasn't in the 'Jersey 'Burbs!


laugh
Posted by: DLC

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/05/13 01:07 PM

That's odd.... the bird doesn't look like Christie ! shocked

laugh
Posted by: lanovami

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/05/13 04:54 PM

"And yes, someone needs to start complaining about their Mom not microwaving stuff"

Not microwaving? No, she microwaved EVERYTHING that required heat to be edible!

cry
Posted by: Pirate

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/05/13 08:36 PM

Wild Turkey....doesn't that come in a bottle??
Posted by: Celandine

Re: No-Bake Cheese Cake - 11/27/13 06:26 AM



SHRIMP MOUSSE

2 lbs. Peeled Cooked Shrimp
1 Bundle of Green Onions
2 Lg. Stalks of Celery
8 oz. Cream Cheese
8 oz. Sour Cream
1/2 c. Mayonnaise
1/2 c. Tomato Catsup
1/2 c. Chili Sauce
1/4 c. Lemon Juice
1 t. Worcestershire Sauce
1 t. Salt
1/2 t. Dried Tarragon
1/4 t. Red Hot Pepper Sauce
2 Envelopes Knox Gelatin - dissolved in
1/2 c. Cold Water

GELATIN MOLD: Sprayed w/ Non-Stick Spray, or Lightly Oiled.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COOK: Shell - Devein Shrimp, Coarsely Chop & Set Aside.
SLICE: Green Onion-Tops into 1/4" Slices
PROCESS: Celery Stalks
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SPRINKLE: Unflavored Gelatin onto Cold Water & Stir.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ADD: Next 10 Ingredients & Gelatin Mixture To Food Processor.
CREAM: Together.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ADD: Shrimp, Celery, Green Onions, &
BLEND: Until Just Well Mixed.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
POUR: Into Oiled Gelatin Mold
CHILL: Between 5 Hr. & Over-Night.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TURN OUT: Onto Chilled Plate
GARNISH: w/ Parsley, Onion Slivers & Reserved Shrimp.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SERVE: with Knife onto Various Crackers.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 12/06/13 11:12 AM

Originally Posted By: DLC
That's odd.... the bird doesn't look like Christie ! shocked

laugh

Aye...
...he's lost a lot of weight
since he got his gizzard stapled...

Anyway,
I just did up another
of those Greek Yogurt CheeseCakes..

The BONUS for the Work
is that I get to Lick the Beaters
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 03/25/14 10:04 AM


spin a while...
...time to bUmP dis puppy to de top...


I found a new variation on an old theme...
...Southern Pulled Pork a'la Slow Cooker

Slow Cooked In SODA PoP! (a carbinated tenderizer)

The author recommends RootBeer(Sassafrass Flavor)
but I found a source of MY Favorite Pop: GINGERBEER
(made with honest to GOODness Ginger! Sweet & Spicy

I'll let you know how it turns out... smile
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 03/25/14 10:31 AM


spin a while...
...time to bUmP dis puppy to de top...


I found a new variation on an old theme...
...Southern Pulled Pork a'la Slow Cooker

Slow Cooked In SODA PoP! (a carbinated tenderizer)

The author recommends RootBeer(Sassafrass Flavor)
but I found a source of MY Favorite Pop: GINGERBEER
(made with honest to GOODness Ginger! Sweet & Spicy

I'll let you know how it turns out... smile


I'm doing it MY Way:
Maranading a cleaned Picnic Pork Shoulder
in BBQ Sauce & GingerBeer in the fridge...

I'll slow roast it tomorrow @ 325F for
25 min per pound.. internal temp 160 F
allow it to cool, debone & shred it with
more BBQ Sauce+ whatever it needs to taste.


I can already tell it's a WINNER just by
sampling the mixed BBQ Sauce & GingerBeer
Posted by: Celandine

The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 08/22/14 06:15 AM

.
..

[bUmP]

Roast Pork For Cuban Sandwiches

Ingredients :
2 lbs. boneless center pork loin roast
3 cloves garlic
1 tsp. salt
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 cup sour orange juice
(If you can't get sour oranges in your area, try equal parts orange and grapefruit or 2 parts orange to 1 part lemon and 1 part lime)
1 cup minced onion
1/2 cup Spanish olive oil

Mash the garlic and salt together with a mortar and pestle. (A rolling pin on a cutting board works pretty good too.) Add dried oregano, onion and the sour orange to the mash and mix thoroughly. Heat oil in small sauce pan, add the mash to the oil and whisk.

Pierce pork roast as many times as you can with a sharp knife or fork. Pour garlic mixture (save a little for roasting) over pork, cover and let sit in refrigerator for two to three hours.

Using a suitable roasting pan or rack, sprinkle remaining marinade over pork and cook uncovered at 325°F. Roast until completely cooked (160°F), about 20 minutes per pound. Baste occasionally. Bring pan juices to a boil and simmer until the juice is reduced by half. Sprinkle some juice onto the pork when you put it in the sandwich.

==============

Harissa (Morrocan Hot Sauce)

1 1/2 cups Hot dried red chiles** (loosely packed)
1/3 cup Olive oil
3 Cloves Garlic, minced
1 teaspoon Caraway seeds, ground
1 teaspoon Ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon Ground cumin
** or Rocoto Red Pepper Paste(Peru Food)
** or Smoked Chipotoles w/Sauce **
** Sweetened w/Corn Syrup

In a small saucepan, cover the chilies with water. Boil over moderately high heat
until slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Cover and let soak for 1 hour.
Drain the chiles, reserving the soaking liquid, and transfer them to a food processor.
Add the oil, garlic, caraway, coriander and cumin and season with salt.
Puree until smooth, adding enough of the reserved chile liquid to blend the
sauce. Transfer to a bowl.
The Harissa sauce can be refrigerated for up to 1 week, if you cover the mixture
with a thin layer of Olive oil, and stored in a sealed container.

** Harissa can be Mixed with Mayonnaise as a condiment

SHORTCUT:
*Harissa Sauce: Powdered Coriander-Caraway-Cumin
Seeds, Garlic Powder, Roasted Chipotle chilis in sauce
(processed to a paste) with Mayo, & sweetened with
Corn syrup.

===============

Cuban Sandwich - engineering marvel

The Cuban sandwich (called merely 'sandwich' in Cuba), also known as a Cubano or Media Noche ('midnight'), is a marvellous piece of ethnic culinary engineering. They are most commonly available in (wait for it ...) Cuba - or perhaps, just as often, in parts of Florida, USA. The sizzle is in the grilling.

The ingredients at their most basic are Cuban bread (called merely 'bread' in Cuba), pork, ham (yes, they do come from the same animal), pickles, cheese and one or more condiments. They are tasty and toasted, served in many Florida restaurants and bars, but with the best examples served either in Cuba or at Miami street-corner snack bars called loncherias.

You may follow as much of these ingredient variations as you find convenient, but pay particularly close attention to the preparation and cooking options. The sandwiches are sometimes sold cold, but the hot, grilled Cubano is the hands-down favourite. Many who take home the cold, ungrilled sandwich are just unprepared to grill them properly.

The fact that both meats originate from the pig suggests that, once slaughtered, families would rush to use up one entire animal before it could spoil. Leftovers from roasts and hams were probably combined in these ways to add variety to the meal offerings.

With any ethnic dish - which, of course, means any recipe - there are many possible variations on the theme they present. Recipes called 'authentic' are often authentic only to a locale or even, at times, a family. Rarely are they actually a nationally or ethnically agreed standard that cannot be violated. Still, a few basic rules can provide a set of standards for a dish that can then be adhered to strictly, or violated grotesquely, at the chef's discretion.

One last caveat - most of the ingredients of the Cubano were first brought to Cuba by the Spaniards in the 1500s. It took the Cubans 400 years to perfect their sandwich, and it is worthwhile to remember that many Cuban recipes changed abruptly with the American embargo of Cuba since the 1950s.

Here, then, are the basics for the delectable dish known as the Cuban sandwich. Understand that this recipe calls for special equipment, but substitutes can be improvised. Improvisational choices can be found at the end of the entry.

Cuban Bread

The Cuban bread is sometimes replaced with French or Italian loaves of bread. It is, like those other baked delights, long, slender, and hard-crusted. Some sandwich recipes call it a sourdough bread and some a water bread. Historical references suggest that the bread is made with a bit of lard, differentiating it from European versions.

The water bread toasts better, so don't settle for anything less. Also, eat it soon (the day it is baked), as the lard causes it to dry out quickly. Historically, when bread was not readily available, a crispy flat bread made from cassava or yuca flour (called casabe) was substituted.

Breads are often made 'crustier' by the addition of a pan of water or ice in the baking oven.

To make two loaves of an acceptable bread (without lard):
In a large bowl dissolve 2 1/4 teaspoons of active dry yeast in 8 fluid ounces of warm water or potato water 1(45°C or 110°F).
Add one tablespoon of white sugar and one of salt; mix well.
Stir in seven cups of flour and knead dough for seven minutes.
Add an eighth cup of flour, place dough in a greased bowl (turning once to cover the other side) and let proof (rise) until doubled.
Form dough into two long loaves on a lightly floured board.
Sprinkle one tablespoon of cornmeal on greased baking sheet; place loaves on top.
Slash the top down the centre with a sharp knife. Cover and let rise until almost doubled.
Brush top of loaves with about two tablespoons of cold water.
Sprinkle with one tablespoon of sesame seeds (optional) and place in a cold oven.
Turn oven to 200°C (400°F), and bake for 45 minutes, or until nicely browned.
Brush twice during baking time with cold water.

Or, better still, with lard (again, two loaves):
Dissolve 1/4 yeast cake in 1/4 of water at about 45°C or 110°F.
Put one tablespoon of butter, one tablespoon of lard, two tablespoons of sugar, and two and-a-half teaspoons of salt in a large bowl, and pour on 2 cups of boiling water.
When the temperature has dropped to about 45°C or 110°F, add dissolved yeast cake and five cups of flour.
Stir until thoroughly mixed and add a last cup of flour.
Mix, and turn onto a floured surface, and knead until mixture is smooth and elastic.
Return to bowl, cover with a clean cloth and cover.
Let proof (rise) over night at about 65°F to 70°F.
The next day, cut through, turning over dough several times.
Dough may be proofed again until it is convenient to shape it into loaves.
Toss on slightly-floured surface, knead, and shape into long loaves and place on baking sheets.
Cover, let rise again to double its bulk, and bake in 400°F hot oven for about 40 minutes. (Beef dripping may be substituted for lard. butter will work, but won't be as white as with lard.)

Additional recipes claiming to be Cuban bread can be found on the Internet. One such is the 'James Beard's Cuban Bread' which includes the cornmeal but skips the lard. The key is to try recipes that sound good to you, and not worry too much about precision (as this is a lost cause).

Roast Pork

Cuban recipes abound for roasting pork. Roast pork can be cooked with garlic or marinated in Mojo . I provide one typically delicious recipe here for consideration. Adjust seasonings to taste, if this doesn't sound absolutely fantastic!
Crush six cloves of garlic and one teaspoon of salt together in mortar and pestle, bowl, or food processor.
Add two tablespoons of fresh (or dried) oregano.
Add one cup of diced yellow onion (white can be substituted) and the juice of a lemon, a lime, and two oranges.
Heat half a cup of Spanish olive oil in a sauté pan, add mixture and whisk.
Pierce a 3lb boneless centre pork loin roast over and over.
Pour most of the mixture over the sirloin and marinade in the refrigerator for a minimum of two hours.
Preheat oven to 450°F and roast in a pan, reducing the heat to 350°F, basting occasionally.
Add the rest of the marinade as it cooks for one and-a-half hours.

Ham

The ham is sometimes baked, but often boiled. Some prefer a sweetness content that suggests honey, sugar, or maple-cured. Feel free to use any favourite from leftovers (the probable original source) to and including Polish ham. When sliced hams were not available, jamonada dulce (a sort of chopped sweet ham) was often substituted.

Cheese

Original cheeses may have been whatever local resources made available or those brought from Spain. It should not be a hard or sharp cheese, but a soft, mild whitish cheese like Swiss or provolone. Even Gouda will do, but that is a bit softer than generally used.

Pickles

These were probably straight brine-cured, but the Spanish influence could easily be assumed to include either garlic, dill, or both. Feel free to use flat cut pickles as probably the easiest to assemble. You'll never notice the difference.

Condiments

The most commonly mentioned are mayonnaise, butter, and/or mustard (probably not the yellow, fancy mustard, but use what you like). There is a greenish, pesto-like sauce made with olive oil and herbs that is marvellous. Create your own.

Additional Variations

Salami, while sometimes used, is not part of an authentic Cuban Sandwich; nor is bologna, pastrami, etc. Violate this as you like. The El Pilon Cafe, in south Tampa, for example, can sell 400 Cubanos a week. They make their sandwiches with boiled ham, marinated pork, Genoa salami and Swiss cheese. Provolone is sometimes suggested as well. These all have variations considered to be authentic by their sources.
Additional layers can be included, if you feel you do not eat enough vegetables: lettuce, tomatoes, onions , bell peppers, hot peppers, or even thin apple slices are among the favourites. Try making one without them first. You'll probably never bother to add them in.

Assembly

For each loaf, you will split it in half and apply a condiment of choice to the bottom half (try just butter).
Add a layer of pickles (any additional layers should also go here).
Apply 4oz thinly-sliced roast pork and 4oz thinly-sliced ham.
Add 4oz of sliced cheese.
Apply any desired condiments to the upper half (perhaps just mustard) and complete the assembly.

The sandwich may look assembled and ready, but this is where the engineering comes in. You will want to butter the outside, or butter the press used for grilling.

Grilling

This is what separates a Cuban sandwich from a toasted submarine sandwich. The trick is to flatten the sandwich while grilling and toasting the outside. This allows the pork, ham and pickles to be heated in their own steam, and fuses all the flavors together with the cheese. Each loaf is supposed to make four servings, but count on eating two. One traditional slicing method merely cuts the loaf along the end-to-end diagonal, creating two elongated pizza-slice shaped halves.

The most common sin is the application of insufficient pressure in the grilling. A firm, heavy pressure is absolutely required for the best results. The sandwich should be about a quarter of its original height when done. The heat can be as sophisticated or crude as situations allow. All options take about ten minutes, but keep an eye on them.

Grilling options include (alphabetically):
Campfire - take assembled and buttered sandwiches, wrapped in heavy aluminium foil. Make sure you have a couple of large flat rocks to heat in the fire. Place the sandwiches between the hot rocks. Add weight (additional rocks) as necessary.
George Foreman Grill - Basically, this is a grilling press, just add plenty of pressure. Try adding the pressure to the top, rather than the handle, to keep from accidentally breaking handle or hinges.
Griddle - electric or stove-top, but place a heavy iron skillet or bacon press on top. Keep adding weights until the pressure is sufficient. And, be sure to flip it to toast the opposite side!
La Plancha - a traditional sandwich press that heats top and bottom simultaneously.
Oven - heat oven, pan and weights (6-8 firebricks wrapped in aluminum foil work well) to 500°F. Place sandwich on pan and weigh down with bricks.
Panini grill - expensive, but can create a smooth or wavy sandwich depending on the design.
Waffle Iron - a bit off-beat, but in a pinch will be better than not grilling at all.

Eating

Properly made and served, you'll find eating the Cubano to be a two-handed enterprise. Pressed and grilled, it will not fall apart easily like a hamburger or BLT; but it will be long, narrow, and moist enough to drip if eaten with one hand. Best to keep a couple of napkins handy in any case.

Be prepared to use elbows, knees and feet to protect your sandwich. Your hands will be very busy, as will your mouth.

Remember that many people rave about these wonderful sandwiches, even when eaten unheated and unpressed. The only thing you won't be is unimpressed.
Posted by: Celandine

Re: The Self-Rising, All Food & Recipe Thread - 11/07/14 03:52 PM

.
CHICKEN POT PIE
(with a few a Copy-Cat Twists)

**Copy-Cat KFC Chicken Pot Pie

Ingredients
* 2 Potatoes, peeled and cooked
* 2/3 cup frozen Peas
* 2 **Cream of Chicken Soup
* 2 Carrots, peeled and cooked
* 2 tablespoons frozen onion
* 2 cups of cooked Chicken
* 1 dash each Salt and Pepper
* 1 dash MSG
* 1 recipe **Red Lobster Cheddae Bay drop biscuit dough
* 2T . Butter, 1 t. garlic powder 1/2 t. crushed
dry parsley

Directions
1. In a bowl combine all cooked vegetables and chicken.
2. Add the **cream of chicken soup and seasoning. The mixture should be thick but not too thick. If the mixture is too thick, add some milk to the mixture.
3. Pour into buttered 3 Quart Oven Proof Dish.
4. Top with dollops of **Red Lobster Cheddar Bay garlic drop biscuit dough.
5. Bake in a 425ºF oven for 25-30 minutes or until it is heated through and the crust is golden brown.
===============================
**Copy-Cat CAMPBELLS Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup

Use as an ingredient in your signature recipes.
Serves: 2 cans (10 3/4 ounces each)

Ingredients
* 1 1/2 cups chicken broth
* 1 1/2 cups milk or milk alternative, divided
* 1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
* 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
* 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
* 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
* 1/4 teaspoon salt
* 1/4 teaspoon dried parsley
* Dash paprika
* 5 tablespoons corn starch
* Shredded chicken as desired

Directions
1. In a medium saucepan, bring to boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup milk, poultry seasoning, onion powder, garlic powder, salt and pepper, parsley, and paprika stirring occasionally.
2. In a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup milk and cornstarch until smooth and watery. Slowly add the cornstarch mix to the saucepan stirring constantly. Return mixture to a boil and continue stirring until the soup thickens.
3. Remove from stove and cool.
4. Add desired amount of shredded chicken. I use less than half of a chicken breast. Or, you can eliminate the chicken. The base is yummy even without the chicken. Use as an ingredient in your signature recipes.
===========================
**copy-cat Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Garlic Biscuits

425º 15 min. (**Or 25-30min used as Toping)

Yield 10 biscuits

Ingredients
* 2 cups all-purpose flour
* 1 tablespoon sugar
* 1 tablespoon baking powder
* 2 teaspoons garlic powder
* 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
* 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional
* 1 cup buttermilk
* 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
* 1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese
*
For the topping
* 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
* 1 tablespoon crushed dry parsley leaves
* 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Directions
* Preheat oven to 425ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat; set aside.
* In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, garlic powder, salt and cayenne pepper, if using.
* In a large glass measuring cup or another bowl, whisk together buttermilk and butter. Pour mixture over dry ingredients and stir using a rubber spatula just until moist. Gently fold in cheese.
* Using a 1/4-cup measuring cup, scoop the batter evenly onto the prepared baking sheet. Place into oven and bake for 10-12 minutes, or until golden brown.
* For the topping, whisk together butter, parsley and garlic powder in a small bowl. Working one at a time, brush the tops of the biscuits with the butter mixture.
* Serve immediately.

**Spoon onto cooked ingredients when used as a topping.