Windows XP expires after 1 year?

Posted by: apsinnott

Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/27/01 08:14 AM

Does anyone know for a fact that WIndows XP Home Edition expires after 1 year of use? I have heard rumours that people would have to pay the addittional $100 for XP Pro in order to avoid this rental setup.<br>This would certainly be another reason to switch to a Mac!<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/27/01 09:01 AM

No ... Windows XP isn't a subscription product.<br><br>The subscription model is part of Microsoft's long-term .Net Internet-based software strategy. They were going to offer Office XP on a subscription basis in the U.S., but they backed off at the last minute. (You can buy it that way in Australia and New Zealand, though.)<br><br>In the license agreement for my Office X there's a paragraph that deals with a "Subscription Product" expiring after a year, but Office X isn't a subscription product so it doesn't apply.<br><br>With Windows XP you have to do that product activation thing within a month or so, but after that it's yours to keep.<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/27/01 04:07 PM

I think there's lots o' rumors goin' 'round lately.<br>The latest is about Mac Office V X expiring after a year. Anyone been able to confirm that one?<br><br><br>[color:red] Kill the brain and you kill the ghoul. </font color=red>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/27/01 07:02 PM

Another "rumor" and nothing more.<br><br>Subscription method does not apply to Office v. X or to Win XP in U.S. Dunno about Office v. X elsewhere, however.<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/28/01 08:09 AM

Microsoft has said that Office v.X will not expire after one-year; that part of the license agreement is incorrect. Still, it seems inevitable that subscriptions will take over in the future...<br><br>
Posted by: Anonymous

Re: Windows XP expires after 1 year? - 11/28/01 09:39 AM

Hard to know IMO.<br><br>Microsoft has traditionally not only beta tested their software products on the backs of users, but is known for their "trial balloons."<br><br>Sometimes they'll announce a change, invariably to their advantage (perceived or otherwise), then wait for reaction. If the reaction is especially negative they back off, if only temporarily.<br><br>I've always thought of it as pushing the "gripe envelope" to see what they can get away with next. As monopolistic power has grown, they obviously can shove things down the users' throats and get away with it more easily.<br><br>But even with today's market situation they've deferred on occasion. Whether this is due to a perceived short term lack of revenue is invariably hard to determine. While this *appears* to have happened in this case, with the U.S. and European markets (and others) not included in the new scheme, I submit one just never knows.<br><br>I agree that this is an idea Microsoft has been throwing around for years and would therefore appear to be inevitable, but, again, one just never knows.<br><br>It has always struck me that the monolithic monster that Microsoft has become doesn't always seem to achieve the internal agreement on major issues as easily as might otherwise be expected.<br><br>I quite honestly don't know if you are correct in your forecast or not. It *appears*, for example, that Mr. Bill & Co. have backed off certain aspects of .Net which were discussed or announced earlier. But one just never knows if the "planned" or "announced" ideas were serious or mere trial balloons, or even something in between.<br><br>I just don't know but won't be surprised by anything until (or "if" would be more appropriate) some action is finally taken to seriously impair Microsoft's monopolistic practices. Given the fact, in the face of the then continuing DOJ matter, Microsoft continued to implement some of the same old practices with XP one wonders if Mr. Bill & Co. think they can continue, indefinitely, to push the envelope or "innovate" unless something truly serious is done to curtail their activities (of whatever kind).<br><br><br><br>128k_Mac<br>"When in doubt, reboot" - CaseCom
Posted by: apsinnott

One more foot in the grave for Microsoft - 11/30/01 06:37 AM

Thanks for the info. As far as I have been able to disconcern, the Subscription program does not apply to any of Microsofts current consumer titles in the USA.<br>They have been toying with new "features" and programs to ensure a stable cash flow. Smart tags (in Win XP at least) and subscription programs both were set aside due to negative consumer reaction. I believe the subscription item in the Office v.X's license may have been from a default Microsoft license which they modified for their use and happened to contain that paragraph. Other websites have said that Microsoft's Mac unit decided not to incoporate product activation due to the additional time and manpower it would have taken to intergrate it.<br>It appears to me that since Microsoft has a deathgrip on the market they are attempting to see just how much consumers and the business market will pay through the nose.<br>Hopefully this will help hasten their inevitable downfall.<br><br>