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Sure, it's a phrase that has been in my vocabulary since my earliest recollections. But now that it's been brought up,I must know more:

Origin[s]

Hunkey dorey
There's no agreed derivation of the expression 'hunky-dory'. It is American and the earliest example of it in print that I have found is from a collection of US songs, George Christy's Essence of Old Kentucky, 1862:

Hunkey Dorey

As sung by Christy's Minstrels.
Air - "Limerick Races"

One of the boys am I,
That always am in clover;
With spirits light and high,
'Tis well I'm known all over.
I am always to be found,
A singing in my glory;
With your smiling faces round,
'Tis then I'm hunkey dorey.

The Christy Minstrels were a 'blackface' minstrel group formed by Edwin Pearce Christy, George Christy's father. Both men were born in the USA, but Christy is an Irish surname and the tone of the above lyrics, along with the Limerick-based tune, all point to an Irish association with the phrase.

More here.

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