Well, as long as we're making observations: as horrible as what happened in Boston was, I find it telling that we as a country over-obsess on such things when they happen to us here, but generally ignore similar events when they happen to others. For example, 26 people were killed today in multiple bomb attacks in Afghanistan and 16 injured in a bombing in Bangalore, but good luck finding a ton of coverage about those in the in the US media.

Meanwhile, we're being treated to the same video clips of the Boston attacks over and over and over and over and over and over again, along with basically the exact same coverage ad nauseam ...

Don't get me wrong, I don't want us to be blasť about attacks such as the one in Boston, but at some point we as a society (or maybe just our media) need to recognize that this is the world we live in, that these kinds of things will happen again no matter what the precautions, and that it would probably be better to stop sensationalizing them as if they were 9/11 all over again when they do happen ...

Part of the problem is, of course, the 24-hour, instant-gratification news cycle and its ravenous gaping maw of need to churn-out anything at all as long as it fills air. Back in the day, it would be "XXX News is reporting bombs exploding near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. We'll bring you more information as it becomes available. Now, back to 'The Guiding Light.'"

Today we get Rachel LIVE from Boston (because it's so much more newsworthy that she's broadcasting from THERE) reporting on basically nothing that we didn't already know from the previous 8 hours of non-stop coverage. But it's a Big Thing That Happened To Us, so the coverage must be driven into the ground ...

Anyways, I'll stop there because I could go on and on ;-)

Like some here, I've stopped watching/reading any kind of media coverage until things get a little more sane, and have wallowed a bit in being disappointed at how long it takes for that to happen ...